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from the
Cumberland and Westmorland Herald

Pack’s tally of three foxes, quad bike and mobile phone!
Saturday, 26 February 2005

A JOINT meet of the Ullswater pack and the Border Foxhounds was held at Ridlees Old House in atrocious conditions, but hounds flew all day and found a tally of three foxes, a quad bike and a mobile phone before the day was brought to a close late in the day at Featherwood!
The snow was well down when hounds met at the kennels but a long drag which began in Blea Cove took in Birkhouse Moor, Catsty Cam and Brown Cove, writes TRIMBUSH.
They were brought back to Kepple Cove where the drag was struck again, taking hounds through the savins to Haystacks where they roused their fox but little could be done with him in the conditions.

PACK LAID ON

As they drew on around Heron Pike to Black Crag, Gordon ’04 brought a fox from Watson Dod via Hartside, Nameless, and Scott Crag to Linkindale, where the pack was laid on.
A cracking hunt then went through the park before turning out for Dowthwaite Head and the forestry, where fresh foxes split the pack and brought an end to the day.
This was not before Raymond Ritchie witnessed Modesty ’98 catching a fox on her own which turned out to be yet another fox maimed by shooting, having only three good legs.
Martin Robinson and his family welcomed the hunt to Throng Crag farm with an excellent meet and the hounds returned the favour with an excellent hunt from Beda Fell when a fox from a rush bed was hunted hard to cross the valley below Boredale Head.
The hunt then turn down the valley by Nettleslack to Houstead Brow, where they checked briefly before going on by Winter Crag and Cotehow to Steel End and turned up the top for Pikeawassa where they disappeared from view for a while.
Next seen, they were running into the forest at a top pace and then dropped in for the beck edge to mark, eventually bolting the fox which went to ground again and was caught shortly after bolting at Dale Head.
On 17th February, the day before anti-hunt legislation came into force, the pack met at the White Lion Inn, Patterdale, and accounted for two foxes.
A good hunt ensued from Brow Crags which took hounds around the head of Deepdale by Greenhow End to Dovedale savins and then on down Low Wood to Cora Crag, where a fresh fox got up.
A few of the hounds, however, stuck at their fox and hunted around Hartsop Hall, Bull Crag and then on to Caudale Beck. The fox was seen at Hartsop Hall bridge and hounds were then got together to hunt by the head of Brotherswater to New Close, where “home” was blown late in the day, having given the fox best.

FLUSHING TO GUNS

Huntsman John Harrison said: “The hounds will now operate under the new legislation and, following advice and suggestions from the Government, Defra and animal welfare organisations, along with guidance from the Council of Hunting Association, will be flushing to guns using two hounds.
“This will continue until the end of the lambing season and anyone wanting to make use of the service should call the kennels on 017684 82230.
“This pack will also be exercised regularly as some 40-odd hounds need mental and physical stimulation. Fox-based drag lines may be used to keep them sane and every attempt will be made to keep within the law.

Four foxes accounted for in a day
Saturday, 19 February 2005

GARY Robinson and the team at the Golden Fleece, Brough, made the Ullswater Foxhounds and their followers very welcome and the hospitality was much appreciated by all.
Hounds struck a drag below Mal Placket and feathered the line through Middle Fell and Lang Fell to Roman Fell End, where the fox got up, writes TRIMBUSH.
Paul Robinson and the gang were on hand to send them away and a fast hunt crossed Scoredale to Mell Fell. They crossed Gasdale to Murton Pike then dropped in by Harbour Flatt to Keisley, where hounds checked in sheep but were soon on their way again to Bow Hall, where they marked and two foxes were eventually accounted for.
From the Travellers Rest, hounds marked on the Dod and then hunted the bolted fox through Mossdale to Heron Pike and back by the Rake to the Dod before dropping down nearly to the road by the village, where they killed.
From the Crown and Mitre, Bampton, hounds were loosed on Rosgill Moor and drew Scalebarrow to Bewbarrow, where a few hounds got away on their own.
The pack was soon reunited and a fair hunt crossed to Kennel Crag and Dog Crag before hounds went away for Swindale Head and out for Naddle and the forest, where they dropped in for the dam and caught their fox.
Captain Whelter bog held a fox which took hounds to Hop Ghyll. It was soon bolted and a fast hunt went down the valley by Swindale Head nearly to Truss Gap, where they crossed to Gouther Crag then followed the fell wall out to Mosedale.
The pack was lost in the mist and gale for a while but was then seen and heard coming in for Black Bells through Captain Whelter. Hounds hardly checked as they dropped in by the Simon Stone to Yew Close, Dog Crag and Kennel Cragg.
It all fell apart, but they were held on and regained the line beyond Gouther Crag and, once again, set sail along the fell wall for Mosedale. The gale had worsened in the latter part of the day and they were eventually defeated beyond Yew Close by the wind.
From Hartsop Hall, hounds were busy around the savins but scent was never good from the start and they were unable to account for any foxes.

HOWTOWN HUNT

David and Mrs. Baldry welcomed the hunt once again to the Howtown Hotel. A huge following saw Hallin drawn blank but a fox was marked, bolted and caught behind the old church.
A dog and vixen were then marked to ground in the forest, the dog being bolted and marked in the fields below, while the vixen took hounds up Rampsgill to the head of the valley and then over High Street into atrocious winds where the pack split at some point.
Some hounds were found at Blea Water and the rest were found marking in Fordingdale, where a further two foxes were added to the tally, making four on the day.
“Memorable for all wrong reasons the day prejudice and bigotry won”

THE LAST HURRAH FOR HUNTING
Saturday, 19 February 2005

IT was the end of an era as the historic Blencathra Foxhounds set off for the last time on Thursday ahead of the new legislation making hunting with dogs illegal.

The pack, led by huntsman Barry Todhunter, followed in the footsteps of the first hunt from the site by Squire Crozier back in 1826, up Blease Fell and Souter Fell.
Blencathra Foxhounds was formed as a private pack in 1826 by the squire and became a subscription pack in 1870 but more than 150 years of tradition is now at an end.
The Blencathra foot pack is steeped in tradition, many of the hounds in the kennels today being from the line of John Peel’s famed pack.
Joint master Jim Cox has vowed the pack will maintain its infrastructure for at least a year. “We will look after the hounds and the huntsman until the legal position regarding hunting is resolved or we run out of money,” said Dr. Cox.
“It is a really sad day. If there was a rational argument to ban hunting it would be easier to stomach, but what is happening here is a result of prejudice and bigotry.”
Over the last few weeks many local people have been going along to the hunt meetings for the first time, wanting to know what the tradition is all about.
The hunt has also welcomed people from around the world, including Norway and Denmark where there is still a hunting tradition.
Dr. Cox addressed more than 200 supporters who turned out for the last meet at the Blencathra Kennels on Thursday. He said: “Some days in history you remember all your life today is memorable but for all the wrong reasons. It is the day when prejudice and bigotry won and that is wrong.”

ANGER AND SADNESS

Tears mingled with anger and sadness for many of the supporters who have been with the hunt all their lives.
Kathleen Liddle, from Penrith, could not hold back the tears. She has hunted with the Blencathra pack all her life. “I was set to take early retirement with my husband so we could follow our passion for hunting. Now this is at an end and I just feel rotten. It seems the Government just does not want to understand our way of life.”
Kathleen Stevens has been involved in the hunt since she was a child in Borrowdale and her family kept hounds for the Blencathra during the summer.
“At the moment it doesn’t seem real we are just stopping a month early for the summer. We walk Blencathra Stormer and his one-year-old son Storm Boy, who has not even been out with the pack yet. I remain optimistic that something will happen and we will see Storm Boy out on the fells.”
Mrs. Stevens has introduced her family to the hunt and has taken her three grandchildren, Gemma Taylor, aged six, Joseph Stevens, who is five, and Gavin Taylor, just four, out up the fells in a backpack since they were babies.
The thoughts of many supporters were with huntsman Barry Todhunter, only the seventh huntsman in the pack’s history, who faces an uncertain future after serving the hunt for the past 32 years.
Like many followers, Mr. Todhunter shed a few tears as the pack set off up Blease Fell for its final day’s hunting.
His wife, Sue, wiping her tears, said: “We must have hope for the future. It is just so shocking that the Government can take your life away from you, but we are determined to keep the tradition going for now.”
Champion fell runner Kenny Stuart, from Threlkeld, was one of those out hunting for the last time. “This ban won’t save a single fox. It’s sheer hypocrisy,” he said. “This legislation will wreck our social lives.”
Retired butcher John Hodgson, who also lives in the village, has been hunting all his life, and has known four of the huntsmen Jim Dalton, George Bell, Johnnie Richardson and now Barry.
He said: “I don’t think it is in any way sad. We are lucky to have been able to enjoy it. I have still got my fishing for now at least.”

LOSS TO LOCAL ECONOMY

Peter Danby-Smith travelled from Malton, in Yorkshire, to witness the final hunt and said: “I think the ban is unpoliceable, but people will largely abide by the law. It’s going to affect the local economy, especially the hotels because I hunt quite regularly in the Lake District and I won’t come back easily again.”
Superintendent Steve Turnbull, from Cumbria police, said the police did not anticipate any problems when the ban became law as they had adopted a policy of speaking to the hunts prior to the ban coming into force.
The Blencathra hunt will meet today, but there are no plans to defy the hunt ban.

Huge turnout welcomed at Walloway Farm meet
Saturday, 12 February 2005

FROM The meet at the kennels of the Ullswater pack kennels the hounds drew all around the valley but failed to rouse a fox even though there were touches of drag all day, writes TRIMBUSH.
Alf Edmondson once again made all welcome at Walloway Farm, where a huge turnout enjoyed his hospitality before the hounds moved off to draw Little Mell Fell. A fox was soon on the move but this quickly came to nothing.
In the warm sunshine which prevailed scenting was virtually non-existent and the hounds struggled all day until James Johnson halloed a fox by his garden. They initially ran the heel line but were righted and held on to Little Mell Fell at Lowthwaite, where they worked up to their fox in the whins.
Putting him away, they ran to Thackthwaite Ghyll, climbed out for the top and then dropped down into Lowthwaite Ghyll, where they again worked up to their fox. After some close quarter hunting they killed in the old building — a fine performance in atrocious scenting conditions.
A bye day was put in at Hartrigg and two foxes were found. The first was moved on Ill Bill and hunted slowly through Froswick, Wander Scar and Gavel Crag to Hall Cove.
This hunt then headed out through Gillespie Ghyll to High Street, where Steve Wooff found the hounds coming to Gavel Crag with a very patchy hunt. They marked in Gavel Crag and then bolted this fox, which might well have been the one they had first moved.
They hunted around Lingmell to Nan Bield and in for Smallwater and Piot Crag. They eventually marked in Blea Crag, where this fox was given best.
Robert McCosh hosted the very popular meet at Dalemain, from where the hounds were vanned to Row Head and loosed on to Heughscar.

UNDER PRESSURE

A fox was soon under pressure in the whins and it was hunted hard to Scroggs Wood and then out by Winder Hall and and High Winder to Black Barn Wood. It was there Singwell '97 marked and this fox was accounted for.
They found again in the Whitbystead whins, ran through Potlands and then headed out over the fields to Helton Head. They marked in this area and this fox was also accounted for.
The next day was a bye day and this was put in at Millriggs Farm, Kentmere, where the HP Plantation held a fox which took the hounds by Croft Head and Diatomite Wood to Kentmere Hall, where the scent failed.
As they were being brought back they struck the line of another fox by the diatomite works and this fox was hunted back up the water to Kentmere Hall, Ivan Scar and Raven Crag.
They crossed the road on to Rook Howe, but sheep foiled the line and so they were blown up at Hall Wood. They regained the line and hunted slowly over the river to Longhouse Farm.
They went on to Millriggs Ghyll, where they turned out for Longhouse Plantation, feathering all the way. Sticking to their task well, they appeared at the top of the plantation still on the line, but were quickly taken to a view by Lindsay Cowen at the top of the trees.
The hounds burst away over Rasp Howe for Green Quarter, where they marked. A fresh fox bolted and was caught, and the hunted fox was also killed soon after.

FULL KITCHEN AT GHYLL HEAD MEET
Saturday, 05 February 2005

TWO nights of hard frost made the ground extremely hard for the Ullswater pack’s meet at the Stag Inn, Dufton, where Cec and Helen Coxon made the hunt very welcome, writes TRIMBUSH.
The hounds were loosed at Bow Hall and all was quiet as far as Narrow Gate, where a fox was seen in Little Rundale. They were eventually laid on to the line but scent was virtually non-existent and they had to work extremely hard to hunt the line back to Bow Hall.
The fox had run the track and headed on through the fields to Dufton Pike, where they were all but beaten. However, they were held forward and touched the line all the way around Brownber and then back into Threlkeld Side.
Crossing the top of Great Rundale, they went away on an improved scent and eventually worked up to their fox high out in Swindale Ghyll, where they put him up. They then ran hard to Knock Pike, where they checked.

PETERED OUT

They hunted on more slowly to Knock Ore Ghyll and the Duck Pond, after which they turned up the ghyll to recross the road as if heading once again for Swindale Ghyll. However, a lot of weight had been lost and scent finally petered out.
Jimmy and Michelle Hodgson had a full kitchen at their meet at Ghyll Head, Askham. The frost was in once again and very little was done until the hounds marked a fox in up the Heltondale Valley.
This fox was bolted and eventually caught. Although a lot more ground was subsequently covered, there was no more hunting before the end of the day.
Mr. and Mrs. Duncan Sanders provided the hospitality and stirrup cup for the meet at Sandwick.
There was some mist on the tops, but it dispersed soon after the hounds had moved off.
They put off a fox above Hallin Hag Wood and another was seen with a few hounds after it. It was this one which was marked near the top of Hallin Fell before being bolted and caught.
No more was done until a fox was moved up Boredale. The hounds enjoyed a much better scent and they really stretched out as they went to Boredale Head Farm.
They then turned out for the top of Place Fell and turned under the Knight for Scalehow Force. They crossed to Lang Crag, quickly dropped in for Scalehow Wood and headed on for Sandwick and Doe Green, from where they came back to the end of Sleet Fell.
This hunt headed on to Nettleslack, where it is likely the fox was turned by sheepdogs. The hounds never recovered from this check and the fox was eventually given best.

ULLSWATER HOUNDS HUNT THROUGH MIST AND SNOW
Saturday, 29 January 2005

THE Ullswater pack again met at the the Kings Arms, Stainton, where followers enjoyed the hospitality provided by Mr. Jakeman and his staff before the hounds were taken off to draw Mell Fell, writes TRIMBUSH.
Although it was clear in the bottoms, the fell itself could not be seen all day and this made it very difficult to keep track of the hounds when they ran out of the plantation.
The first fox found in the trees took the hounds out by Springbank and then on into the mist, where this hunt lost a lot of weight. However, a handful hunted over the top of Mell Fell and then in by the rifle range to the plantation.
They hunted well down towards the A66 at Springfield, where they caught their fox just outside the trees.
The pack was then reunited at the bottom of the plantation and another fox was quickly found. They hunted this hard above Tarn Moss, where the road stewards coped with the danger posed by the A66 with their usual devotion.
This fox then left the trees and ran hard for Stoddah road end, where it gained the deer farm and the hounds had to be stopped.
Margaret and Tony Harrison welcomed the pack to Millriggs, Kentmere. A fox from Longhouses went out to Rasp Howe and then in for the farm before being hunted back for Millriggs, where it is likely the hounds guessed at an earth in poor scenting conditions.
Drawn back through Longhouse Plantation, they touched a line at the top and feathered all the way through Birk Rigg, Rayner Lot and High House. They continued to touch the line through under Brunt Knott, where they found the hunted fox afresh in spectacular style, only for it to quickly run to ground.
However, it was seen to bolt of its own accord after the hounds had been taken away and so they were quickly laid on. He was then under constant pressure and was eventually caught.
Another fox was accounted for on Pool Scar, while another was hunted by Elf Howe, Park House, Longhouse and Rasp Howe to Green Quarter, where they ran out of scent and were picked up at the end of what had been a long day.
Rosie Lightfoot's cancelled meet was put in on a snowy morning and the hospitality was well up to the usual high standard.

HEMMED IN

The snow hemmed the hounds in to the low fells, but a fox was found in Blea Cove and hunted well by the mines to the Glenridding scree, where they were unable to sort out a check. Fortunately, this fox was seen to head back into the savins and the pack was got together, only to lose the line when it ran the road.
This fox was then hunted by a few hounds down to Lanty Tarn and Keldas. It was caught when it ran into the main body of the pack under the plantation as it headed back for the fell.
Jimmy Hodgson welcomed the pack to Hartsop Hall in his usual style, but rain and gale force winds put paid to any hunting and the day finished early.

Huge crowd of followers at Hartrigg Farm meet
Saturday, 22 January 2005

THE Ullswater pack and a huge crowd of followers were welcomed to Hartrigg Farm, in the Kentmere Valley, by Mr. and Mrs. Mick Booth, writes TRIMBUSH.
As the head of the valley was unfit to hunt, the hounds were drawn through Scale Knotts and then on above Scales to Cowoty Knotts, where they marked a fox to ground above Ivan Scar. It was not long before this fox was bolted and it only just beat the hounds to a hole in the wall to gain valuable time.
They then headed down through Ivan Scar and over the road to Rook Howe before hunting more slowly down the beck to the village, where they marked at a badger sett. It was left there and the hounds were taken away to draw afresh.
The pack then settled to one of a brace found beyond Mart Crag to hunt well over the Garburn trod and through the top of the park for the Kentmere horseshoe, at which point they disappeared into the mist.
The main body of the pack was found in the Troutbeck valley under the Queens Head Hotel, where they had run out of scent. Gathered up, they were taken up the Garburn trod for Kentmere, but a fox was halloed on the top. Although it initially went for Kentmere, it then turned back out, taking the hounds through Lowther Brow, under Yoke and then on for Park Quarry.
They disappeared from view at the bottom of Blue Ghyll and it was quite a while before they were heard and then seen running slowly back towards the quarry.
Just as this hunt seemed to have petered out, the hounds got up to their fox and a fast hunt went in for the the beck. They caught their fox as it climbed the Tongue.
The Elliot family again welcomed the pack to Harbour Flatt. All was quiet as the hounds headed through Thundale and High Cup, but they struck a drag under Peeping Hill.
They hunted down to the Keisley allotments and then back out towards the fell, where they marked in a deep place below the pens. This fox was then given best.
The next three meets were lost to the gales and flooding, but there was a fair scent when the pack met at Hartsop.
A good hunt was had on a fox from Slinger Wood which went by Fall Crags, and Dubhow Ghyll before turning in for Crook-a-Beck and Beckstones.
The hounds then ran the fields to Meneting Bridge and on through the wet bottoms to Hartsop Fold and Slinger Wood. They finally marked at Thom Knott, where this fox was accounted for.
A fox found around Buck was hunted well by Angle Tarn, Fall Crags and Beckstones Crag before he turned back for Slinger Wood, Calf Gates and Prison Crag. A rather slower hunt then turned out through Lowther Lot for Rest Dod and Rampsgill Head, where snow made viewing difficult.
The hounds were next seen coming back finished off High Street, and the outcome of this hunt remained unknown.
A fresh fox bolted from Thom Knott was hunted all around the village and then out to New Close. They then brought it back by the sheep pens to mark behind the village, where nothing more could be done with it.

Number of followers continues to grow
Saturday, 15 January 2005

THE trend of ever larger crowds of supporters attending hunts continued when the Ullswater Foxhounds met at the White Lion, Patterdale.
There were many new faces to be seen, with some enthusiasts having travelled from out of the county while others were locals curious to see their first fell hunt.
From the meet, the hounds were drawn through Place Fell to Silver Point and then on down Birkfell. A view of a fox above Silver Point soon had them running for Grey Crag and in for Side Farm and Harriman’s, where they took to the fields.
They soon started to lose time and so were lifted forward to Silver Point where a fox had been seen. This turned out to be the hunted fox and they once again climbed out for the top then swung through Betty Brae before heading out over Grey Crag and out of sight.

SCENT FAILED

When next seen they were coming back under Grey Crag to Betty Brae once again and it was here that scent failed completely.
Another bumper turnout at the Crown and Mitre, Bampton, saw the hounds loosed at the Swindale crossroad.
The whins on Rosgill Moor were tried, but five hounds set sail for Bewborrow and put off a fox on their own, leaving the main body of the pack a long way behind.
This hunt did improve as they ran through Naddle to Hopghyll then out for the head of Swindale, where they crossed the valley for Yew Close and Outlaw Crag before the hunt ground to a halt.

GIVEN BEST

From the Queens Head, Askham, the hounds were loosed at Widewath Mill and drew the Sceugh, where two foxes jumped up and both crossed the road at Beckfoot for Setterah Park.
However, scenting was non-existent in the fields and they were given best.
The hounds then drew around Helton Fell, Brownbeck and Heltondale, where they marked at two places. One fox bolted and was quickly caught, while another was in a deep place and was accounted for later in the day.
New Year’s Day dawned reasonably dry and calm at the Travellers Rest, Glenridding, despite the forecast, so a move was made to Myer’s Cove and Blea Cove, where a brace were moved.
One fox was hunted through to Braesteads Brow and then up the valley to Low Dyke and Bleaberry, where this hunt came to an end. The other fox was hunted by a handful of hounds by Ghyllside to Keldas, where they ran out of scent in the Hall Bank.
As they were gathered up and set off for the mines at Greenside the predicted weather came in and spoiled a good hunt the hounds had on a fox from the savins. This fox went down the Roughside then dropped in for the Desert on its way back to the savins.
As ever, the hounds could hardly hunt on the scree but went back on the fell and fairly flew from Haystacks through Rowten Ghyll and Sulphate How.
They then went in by the dam to Catsty Cam, where the driving rain and gales on the end put an end to the day.
Hunt chairman Mike Taylforth announced that the day’s cap and proceeds from the Christmas draw will go to the Asian tsunami disaster appeal. Promises to this hunt initiative are being collected and the amount raised will be announced at a later date.

HOUNDS KILL THREE FOXES FROM MEET IN BOREDALE
Saturday, 08 January 2005

RON and Liz Barry entertained a huge following at the Ullswater pack's Roe Head meet, after which the hounds moved off to draw Heughscar and Barton Park, where they found, writes TRIMBUSH.
This fox elected to run the fields back to Roe Head and then headed on to Scroggs Wood, where the scent failed.
The hounds were taken back to Swarthfell to draw and struck a drag on the edge of Swarthbeck Ghyll. They put off their fox soon after under Bonscale Pike.
Turning back down the fell, they crossed the top of the ghyll to run through Whinny Crag and then headed out for the trod and back into view at Loup Knott.
They went on by Lang Crag to White Knott before dropping into the park and losing the line in the fields.
Another hunt went to Pooley Bridge by way of the lake shore, after which they were gathered up at Sharrow Whins.
Put in to draw, they found quickly and ran hard to Barton Bank, where they caught their fox after a very short and sharp hunt.
Three foxes were killed from the meet in Boredale from the four which were found. One was accounted for in Foul's Earth after a sharp course from Redgate Ghyll, a second was bolted and caught at Thrang Crag and the third was found in Buck Crag.
After it was persuaded to move, this fox was hunted by Angle Tarn, Calf Gates and Prison Crag before heading down the wath for Pasture Beck. He went on for Raven Crag on his way back to Troutbeck, but the pressure was too great and he went to ground in the borran at Raven Crag. He was accounted for late in the day.

SNOW AND ICE

Anne and Eddie Pool welcomed the pack to Patterdale on a wet morning. With the fell tops being unfit to hunt because of snow and ice, the hounds were loosed at Aira Force.
There was a long draw before a fox was found in the coombs. The hounds hunted well well on the numerous foxes they then found and were unlucky in that two had to be left in difficult places.
The best hunt of the day was had on a fox viewed by Paul Edgar at the sheep pens. After being laid on by Robin Lightfoot, the hounds flew through the new plantations to Hag Wood and then across the park for the coombs.
As the fox went to under Gate Crags they were closing all the time. Hunting out to the top fence, they turned back in to Kirksty Ghyll and then down the plantation before coming again once again for the coombs.
This was a very good hunt as they as they again circled out by the badger sett and then in for the bottoms of Kirksty Ghyll. The fox was only just in front at this point, but this hunt finished in thick cover with the outcome unknown.
The hounds were not out again until the meet at Thrang Crag Farm, where Martin Robinson provide much good cheer. However, the weather turned bad and, although an effort was made, no foxes were found.

HOUNDS NOT PUT OFF BY MIST
Saturday, 25 December 2004

THE mist was fairly well down as the hounds of the Ullswater pack were loosed into Dudderwick from the Mardale Head meet, writes TRIMBUSH.
However, the conditions did not cause any problems as two foxes were hunted to Rough Sides and back, although neither hunt came to any conclusion.
From Wall End the hounds struck a drag that took them under Caspel Gate, Long Stile and Short Stile, then on through Kidsty to Randale and Whelter. This was the faintest of drags with the hounds only able to speak to the line intermittently.
It took them through Bason Crag to Whelter End, where they wanted to drop in for Benty Howe which is what they did. It was there that they put up their fox.
Once on his feet, their pilot wasted no time before dropping on to the lake shore path and then on to the lake shore. This was probably his undoing, as it enabled the tail end hounds to race along the path and join in the head of the hunt as they climbed out through Lad Crags and into Foreigndale before coming back to the top of Laythwaite.
They appeared to check on the skyline, but their fox had laid down in the reed beds and was soon pushed out. He was then hunted hard back to Whelter, where they marked in a rocky place.
As they were marking strongly they were taken a long way back up the fell and it was not long before this fox left the place without a terrier being entered. He was caught soon after in the bottom of Whelter.
Carl and Ruth Walters and family welcomed a large following to the Low Hullock Howe meet and their hospitality was much appreciated.
The first fox of the day was found on the Howes, but the hounds lost him in the fields below the farm. Another was hunted between the Wath and Ireland Wood, but the scent failed as they went through the fields to the fell by Stanegarth.
However, they picked up the line again on the Hause and got together to hunt slowly through Cawdale and then out over the edge to Heltondale. They stopped short of Brownbeck and hunted down the Hause to the beck bottom, where the scent petered out.
It was thought this fox had gone back to Cawdale and the hounds moved what was probably the run animal out in the White Bog.
The pack then split, with one fox being hunted through Fusedale to the forest, where they killed it. The rest had a short, sharp hunt to ground in the White Bog and that fox was also accounted for.

Large midweek gathering at pack’s Kirkgate meet
Saturday, 18 December 2004

THERE was a large midweek gathering of followers when the Ullswater pack met at Kirkgate, where Mr. and Mrs. Howard provided excellent hospitality, writes TRIMBUSH.
It was a while before the hounds found, but once they got into the Coombs plantation a single hound was heard and the rest of the pack joined in one by one until they were running with a tremendous cry.
However, fresh foxes soon caused a split and, with scenting conditions being far from good, most of the hunts came to nothing, apart from one which developed on a fox that had been gone for 20 minutes.
The hounds managed to stick to the line and eventually marked their fox to ground, where it was accounted for.
Mr. and Mrs. Baldry welcomed a huge following to the Howtown Hotel. Following the meet, the hounds were drawn through the fell for Brock Crag, where a fox was found in below and put under pressure over the open ground as they turned him in for Cote Farm.
They then headed on through the fields for Mellguards and the fell. A lot of weight was lost through the fields and only a slow hunt went through Bonscale to Swarthbeck Ghyll for Barton, where they lost the line.
They were taken back to Fusedale and a fox was found in Ivy Crag. It was coursed to ground in the borran, which the hounds entered to kill unaided.
A long draw through the forest and Rampsgill ensued before the hounds struck a drag on the Nab. They must have put it off in Calf Close and run up Bannerdale before turning out by Ullman Crag and the peat hags.
They climbed nearly to the top of Rest Dod before turning back in through the peat hags and dropping in by Grave Ghyll to the valley floor, where they checked above Dalehead.
Throwing themselves forward to the fell wall, they struck out for Commonside, then Heck Crag and on for Buck Crag. They then climbed out for Satura Gap.
When next seen they were running down the top for Angletarn Pikes and Elephants Head, where they disappeared from view into Boredale.
Car followers then spotted them running down Boredale to Howstead Brow and Winter Crag, where they slowed down and all but lost it in the fields. However, Paul Robinson held them over the road and they regained the line to the top of the hause, where the scent failed completely by the church.
All roads led to Dot’s kitchen at Denny Hill before the hounds were loosed at Burnbanks.
It was Measand Beck before they found, but they then hunted hard for the in-by through Littlewater, Eastward, Howes and Crossgate to Ghyllhead and Butterwick Crag, where they were stopped.
It was a long walk back to the draw and the weather had turned by the time they got there. It was therefore decided to take them home after they had drawn Measand, Lad Crags and Laythwaite to Benty Howe.

THREE FOXES CAUGHT FROM DOCKRAY MEET
Saturday, 11 December 2004

THREE foxes were caught from the Dockray shepherds' meet of the Ullswater pack, writes TRIMBUSH.
The hounds eventually settled to one of a litter found in Latterbarrow Ghyll and hunted through the Low Park to Park Brow, where they had to be helped through the sheep foil and over the road to Aira Force. The hunt improved from this point as they turned up the beck and struck out for the Riddings.
When next seen they were dropping down through Todgill for the wet bottoms, where there was a check. During this, the hounds killed a fresh fox which had sat for too long.
They were then lifted forward to Home Farm, where they picked up the hunted fox. They went out by Norman Crag and over the Riddings before turning in to Aira Beck.
They followed the beck up through Millses and back through the fields to Ulcat Row, where they marked. They then bolted and caught their fox.
The third fox was killed by five hounds which had lost their original quarry on Binks Moss. As they cast forward, they put up and despatched a fox which had been shot and dreadfully wounded.
For the first time in many years the pack was welcomed to the Kings Arms, Stainton, where a large following greatly appreciated the hospitality provided by new landlord Richard Jakeman.
Loosed on to Mell Fell, the hounds dragged up to a fox in the trees and, having got him to his feet, hunted hard to the quarry plantation. They put in a couple of circuits of the trees before pushing their fox out to the allotment, where they killed in the open.
The next fox was found in Routen Ghyll and took them on a circuit of Mell Fell before crossing the road on the moor to enter the Rooking Forestry, where they spent the rest of the day.
From the Knotthouses meet, a long, slow drag developed in Tongue Ghyll which took in Guessing Stones, Pigs Snout, Grizedale Tarn and Raise Ghyll.
They then put off their fox and hunted hard to Black Crag before heading back through Seat Sandal to cross Raise Ghyll for Willie Wife Moor and the back of Helvellyn.
Only 12 hounds got away through Wythburn and Whelpside to Swirls Plantation, and fewer still got as far as Stanah Ghyll and back to the car park at Swirls, where they were stopped.

SNOW AND ICE ON HIGH FELLS
Saturday, 04 December 2004

FROM the Greyhound Inn, Shap, the hounds of the Ullswater pack were transported to Swindale, where they were soon marking to ground on Tailbert Bank in gale force winds, writes TRIMBUSH.
Having bolted and caught this fox, the hounds were drawn on through Gaither Crag to Dog Crag, where they found.
This fox took them out over Dog Crag and then on under Outlaw Crag to Yew Close, from where they dropped into the bottom to mark.
The fox was bolted and they set sail down the valley. They climbed out by Outlaw Crag andBol came in again by Kennel Crag to below Gouther Crag, where they lost the line.

SHARP HUNT

Gathered up and drawn on through Yew Close and over Mosedale Beck for Nabs Crags, they roused a fox which had been sitting very tight just short of Hobgrumble Gill. Lilter 01 pushed the fox out of his benk and a very sharp hunt then went in for the valley floor.
Crossing Hobgrumble Beck at the bottom, the hounds piled the pressure on as they went down the valley before the fox turned out, making for Black Bell’s Borran. After running into view, they killed him in the open.
Drawing on down the valley, they did not find again until Bewbarrow, where a first season hound called Verdict 04 coursed a fox to ground in the brackens.
Quickly bolted, it ran to Rosgill Moor and the Frith, where the hounds split. However, the hunted fox was marked to ground and accounted for late in the day.

CHANGE IN DRAW

Snow and ice on the high fells caused a change in the draw from the Mardale shepherds’ meet, with the hounds being walked on to the Howes where a fox was halloed away at the top end.
Running up Howes Beck, they turned out through the fields short of Stanegarth to run for Low Hullock Howe. They marked their fox to ground just short of Skew’s, where it was accounted for.
They drew on up Cawdale and a fox was marked to ground beyond Ivy Crag. It was caught soon after bolting.
Another fox bolted after being found laid in and was hunted down Cawdale to Carhullan. It headed through the fields to Vaugh Steele, where it turned back for High Howe.
The hounds lost time in the fields, but worked things out nicely before marking under a wall from where this fox was bolted and, after losing them briefly in the farmyard where he had laid down, caught by the farm.
From the Thornthwaite Hall meet, the hounds were loosed at Whiteacre and all was quiet until they settled to a fox seen at Great Crag a while earlier.
This hunt gathered pace through the top of Hop Ghyll and Branstree, after which they headed out over Artle Crag to cross the Gatesgarth trod to Harter Fell.
They were lost in the mist for a while, but were then heard dropping in under the waters for the head of the lake.
They ran well on their fox, which was still some way ahead, and came back to Branstree by the car park.
However, the fox then ran into a few hounds which had never got away on the hunt at Woodfell Ghyll and he was coursed back over the Gatesgarth trod. He then went to ground under Harter Fell, where he was accounted for.

Huge turnout welcomed at Walloway Farm meet
Saturday, 12 February 2005

FROM The meet at the kennels of the Ullswater pack kennels the hounds drew all around the valley but failed to rouse a fox even though there were touches of drag all day, writes TRIMBUSH.
Alf Edmondson once again made all welcome at Walloway Farm, where a huge turnout enjoyed his hospitality before the hounds moved off to draw Little Mell Fell. A fox was soon on the move but this quickly came to nothing.
In the warm sunshine which prevailed scenting was virtually non-existent and the hounds struggled all day until James Johnson halloed a fox by his garden. They initially ran the heel line but were righted and held on to Little Mell Fell at Lowthwaite, where they worked up to their fox in the whins.
Putting him away, they ran to Thackthwaite Ghyll, climbed out for the top and then dropped down into Lowthwaite Ghyll, where they again worked up to their fox. After some close quarter hunting they killed in the old building— fine performance in atrocious scenting conditions.
A bye day was put in at Hartrigg and two foxes were found. The first was moved on Ill Bill and hunted slowly through Froswick, Wander Scar and Gavel Crag to Hall Cove.
This hunt then headed out through Gillespie Ghyll to High Street, where Steve Wooff found the hounds coming to Gavel Crag with a very patchy hunt. They marked in Gavel Crag and then bolted this fox, which might well have been the one they had first moved.
They hunted around Lingmell to Nan Bield and in for Smallwater and Piot Crag. They eventually marked in Blea Crag, where this fox was given best.
Robert McCosh hosted the very popular meet at Dalemain, from where the hounds were vanned to Row Head and loosed on to Heughscar.

UNDER PRESSURE

A fox was soon under pressure in the whins and it was hunted hard to Scroggs Wood and then out by Winder Hall and and High Winder to Black Barn Wood. It was there Singwell '97 marked and this fox was accounted for.
They found again in the Whitbystead whins, ran through Potlands and then headed out over the fields to Helton Head. They marked in this area and this fox was also accounted for.
The next day was a bye day and this was put in at Millriggs Farm, Kentmere, where the HP Plantation held a fox which took the hounds by Croft Head and Diatomite Wood to Kentmere Hall, where the scent failed.
As they were being brought back they struck the line of another fox by the diatomite works and this fox was hunted back up the water to Kentmere Hall, Ivan Scar and Raven Crag.
They crossed the road on to Rook Howe, but sheep foiled the line and so they were blown up at Hall Wood. They regained the line and hunted slowly over the river to Longhouse Farm.
They went on to Millriggs Ghyll, where they turned out for Longhouse Plantation, feathering all the way. Sticking to their task well, they appeared at the top of the plantation still on the line, but were quickly taken to a view by Lindsay Cowen at the top of the trees.
The hounds burst away over Rasp Howe for Green Quarter, where they marked. A fresh fox bolted and was caught, and the hunted fox was also killed soon after.

BYE DAY GATHERING AT HARTSOP VILLAGE
Saturday, 27 November 2004

THE Ullswater foxhounds put in another bye day at Hartsop where hounds were drawn through Calf Gates to Prison Crag, then on through Lowther Lot to Hayesdale without striking a drag, writes TRIMBUSH.
Drawing on through the Knott, hounds marked a fox in the crag face of Knott Ghyll. As this is a notoriously difficult place to bolt foxes from, not much hope was held at bolting this one, but, as he had been fresh marked, an attempt was made and Barney was sent to ask the question!
The fox did bolt, only to re-enter the place so the hounds were drawn up the valley as it wasn’t expected that the fox would bolt again. However, a “halloa” from behind signalled his departure and the hounds flew back to the place and soon settled to the line and climbed straight out to the top of Knott Ghyll and over into Rampsgill Head where, after a circuit of the crags in the head of the valley, they marked in a rock pile from where the fox was bolted and caught.
Reason, meanwhile, had put off another fox on the top and hunted into the head of Riggindale at Ha’penny Crag, then pushed her fox out by Shortstile to High Street and Hayesdale, dropping in for the head of Hayeswater to climb out for Grey Crag.
By this time the pack had been laid on but a lot of time was lost in Grey Crag. Eventually, a slow hunt went around Atty Cove to Threshthwaite Mouth then out for Caudale Moor and Kirkstone Pass.

FINE MEET

They were next seen at Red Pit car park but a fresh fox had split the pack and only a handful hunted the fox back out of Roughsides to Ravens Edge then over into Woundale. Running on down the valley of Troutbeck, they crossed Hallilands by Troutbeck Park then turned down for Longreen Head and Limefitt caravan park, where they were stopped in the dark.
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Ambler put on a fine meet for the hunt and it was a shame scenting conditions did not do the meet justice.
However, an odd fox was hunted through Birkfell to no avail and then a drag was stuck at Longcrag which they hunted beautifully through Scale Howe, over Sleet Fell and to Nettleslack and the fields at Boredale, where the fox must have been headed as it turned back out for Black Crag and up the valley to Fouls Earth, where they marked.

HUNTED HARD

A fox was then found in Red Ghyll and was hunted hard in bank to cross the valley to High Brock Crag and from there into the valley floor above Boredale Head, where they killed in the open.
From the Scales Farm meet, a fox, marked and bolted on Barton Bank, took hounds through Sharrow Whins to the lake shore by the hotel and then on to the yacht club and Waterside House before entering Barton Park and climbing out to the fell at the top corner.
Running out to White Knott, they then dropped back in for Park Foot and the bottom of the park, finally marking to ground above the road at Cross Dormant where he was left.

Poor scenting from pack’s meet at Dry Howe Farm
Saturday, 13 November 2004

SAM and Ian Hodgson welcomed the Ullswater pack to Glencoyne Farm on a muggy morning and hounds were soon taken to draw Moss Crag, writes TRIMBUSH.
All was quiet until they found out in Moss Dale, after which they ran back by Moss Crag and then on to Glenridding Wood, where they turned out for the Dod. Running on through the Rake, they climbed out to Heron Pike where wind caused them to check, but the fox was spotted above Seldom Seen Wood and the pack was lifted forward.
Running back to Moss Crag they set off on a similar circuit to the first, but this time they went farther up the Glenridding screes before turning out over Sheffield Pike to Black Crag.
The main body of the pack had been thrown out by this time, but the lead hounds hunted well back through Seldom Seen to Moss Crag, where the fox took refuge in the crag and was left.
Latterbarrow Ghyll held a fox, but it carried very little scent and was given best. However, another in the Beeches was hunted reasonably well through the park to the pheasant pen, where they turned back for the Beeches.
They climbed straight out for Swineside Knott and then turned down the common wall before returning to the park. Running in by the pheasant pen the pack was gathering weight all the time and by the time they went through for the quarry and turned out for Round How most of the hounds were on good terms with their fox as he dropped in through the pheasant pen.
Once in the thick bracken the hunt slowed again, but the hunted fox was eventually marked to ground in the park and accounted for.
From the Dry Howe Farm meet, the hounds were drawn through Capplefall but all was quiet until Mowdy Bank where they struck a drag which took them through to the fell head above Bannisdale Head.
Cattle foil caused a major check but the fox was seen on the far side of the beck and the hounds were lifted forward.
Once they got settled they ran through Bannisdale Wood and on down the valley nearly back to the meet before dropping in to cross the valley onto Capplefall. Scent was very poor all day and they needed a hand to get them running back over Mowdy Bank to Bannisdale Head, where the fox again crossed the valley back to Bannisdale Wood.
Turning down the wood for a second time, this fox decided to leave the valley and turned out for the fell and Yewbarrow Wood in Longsleddale, where scent failed altogether.
Having been gathered up, the hounds were drawn through Whiteside, Dry Howe and Bannisdale Wood before another fox was found, but this one followed the first to Yewbarrow Wood where fresh foxes intervened and the day ended shortly after.

PRODUCTIVE PERIOD FOR ULLSWATER PACK
Saturday, 06 November 2004

THE opening meet of the Ullswater pack was held at the White Lion Inn, Patterdale, writes, TRIMBUSH.
A fox marked in a crag at Slinger Wood was hunted fairly well on a circuit of the wood before it went away to Thorn Knott. It was marked to ground and accounted for.
Two foxes found at Fouls Earth were killed. One was hunted very slowly down Beda Fell by a handful of hounds which stuck to their task very well and eventually marked to ground on Commonside.
The other fox was put off in the bracken above Boredale Head, but was only hunted for a short way before the hounds marked in a small crag, from where it was bolted and caught.
Steve Dowson welcomed the pack to Dobbin Wood and his hospitality was much appreciated by the large crowd which had descended on his kitchen.
The hounds found in Yew Crag and ran by Hind Crag to mark above Park Gate. The fox was bolted from there and a sharp hunt went down the beck, over Hind Crag and on to the lake shore below Lyulph's Tower, where the hounds killed.
Mother and sons Remedy, Crowner and Chanter had run a fox to ground by Yew Crag and this was bolted and caught below.
The hounds put off again above Collier Hag Wood, but it was a bad start for the main body of the pack and only 12 hounds got away by Yew Crag and Hind Crag. They eventually marked towards Dockray, where they were spotted by Mike Dawes.
Michael Hedley brought his Border pack to visit the area, but the mist descended and the start of the meet at Haweswater was delayed because of high water levels in the becks, so this was a short affair. However, the hounds did catch a fox early on at Castle Crag.

HUGE OCCASION

The meet at the Punchbowl, Askham, was a huge occasion and supporters from all parts of the country saw the hounds move off on Askham Fell.
A fox was marked and accounted for early on, and the hounds then found again in Heltondale. This fox was marked to ground and then bolted, after which it went to Brownbeck.
It then headed down the valley under Scales Farm, but the hounds eventually ran out of scent at Widewath.
They found again high out in Heltondale and were soon running down and out by Kettle Crag to Brownbeck. Turning out for Castleside, they went out for High Street and then in for Swarthbeck Ghyll.
They eventually dropped down the ghyll before climbing out for Bonscale Pike and were next seen crossing for Steel End at Mellguards, where they split into two lots.
However, they were soon together again at the bottom of the hause and climbed straight out over Hallin Fell to mark at Hallin Bank, from where the fox was bolted and caught.
Scenting proved to be terrible at the next meet at Greenbank Farm and the hounds did very well to eventually run a fox to ground at Aiken Crag, where it was accounted for.

Persistence pays off from Braesteads
Saturday, 30 October 2004

FROM the Braesteads meet, the Ullswater pack found a fox by Lanty Tarn and a fair hunt went through the Brow before turning out for Myer's Cove and the Nab, writes TRIMBUSH.
A few hounds had already gone around to Blea Cove and were bringing their fox back into the Nab when the main body of the pack caught them up as they dropped in through Myer's Cove to the fell wall, at which point the fox turned straight out again for the top of the Nab.
Turning in for the fell wall above Grisedale, the hounds ran for the pheasant pen and then on by Lanty Tarn for Keldas. They circled in this area before heading out by Lanty Tarn once again and then over into Westside and the campsite.
They suffered a check in this area, but were lifted forward and hit the line off going back to the fell. However, time had been lost and they ran out of scent above the meet.
Robin Lightfoot had seen the fox at Ghyllside, but as the hounds were taken to the view a fresh fox got up in the bracken bed and a much sharper hunt went up the valley and past the farm.
Crossing the beck below High Rake, they climbed out through the screes and then levelled out for the mines. They dropped in to cross the road and beck at the Powder House, then set sail down the allotment to Myer's Beck and the fields at Ghyllside.
They split just short of Westside, but the hunted fox was marked to ground soon after and accounted for.
Sadie Hindson welcomed the hounds and followers to Matterdale End and her hospitality was much appreciated.
The hounds were drawn up the allotments towards the forestry. Feathering a line into the trees, they were soon speaking on one of several foxes found during the day.
They did well to kill one and were unlucky not to catch another as the day progressed and scenting conditions deteriorated.

Wet and wild affair from Helton meet
Saturday, 23 October 2004

THE meet of the Ullswater pack at Scales Farm, Helton, was a wet and wild affair, with conditions growing steadily worse as the day went on, writes TRIMBUSH.
There was one hunt of note and that was had by a handful of hounds that got away on a fox from the bracken beds above the cattle grid.
Taking to the fields, they ran him down to Widewath before turning through the Sceugh to Butterwick Crag. They then turned back to Widewath and Helton before being stopped on a deteriorating scent typical of what often happens before a storm.
The whins at Whitbysteads held a fox but little could be done with him and so the hounds were drawn on to Heughscar, where three foxes were marked to ground, bolted and caught.

MARKED

From the Greyhound at Shap, the hounds were taken to draw Wet Sleddale. From the dam, they drew the low fell above the quarries to Wasdale, where they marked a fox in the head of the valley.
Bolted, it ran down the valley and through the plantation to the Pink Quarry, where it went to ground on the quarry side and had to be left.
The hounds then drew out through Gargill and over into Crookdale, where they struck a drag around Yarlside Crag. They hunted up to their fox soon after, put him away and hunted over the beck to High House Fell, where they marked. This fox was bolted and caught.
The hounds were then drawn over Great Yarlside and Harrop Pike and into Widepot under Saddle Crags before crossing the beck to Tod Crag.
There, a fox jumped up and a very fast hunt went out around Ullthwaite Rigg and away for Little Mosedale.
The hounds headed on through the plantation and over Brunt Tongue for Mosedale, where they caught their fox.

WARM HOSPITALITY AT HARTSOP HALL
Saturday, 16 October 2004

JIMMY Hodgson welcomed the Ullswater pack to Hartsop Hall with his usual warm hospitality before the hounds were loosed into Low Wood, writes TRIMBUSH.
They were soon feathering a line which took them out by Ghyll Crag and over the top into Deepdale, where they put off their fox.
Hunting back over the top by Ghyll Crag, the pack got together as they crossed the bottom and climbed out by Bull Crag. Going over the top they ran straight to the Terrier Holes, where this fox was given best.
Lifted to a view in the bottom of Caiston, they struggled to hold the line at all and eventually were blown back into the Low Wood, which was drawn blank.
They were then taken to draw the savins in Caiston Glen, which proved to hold a fox. They were soon running around Hartsop Dod to Bull Crag and then hunted over the beck to the Low Wood.
Turning down the wood by the mines, this rather slow hunt came back by the head of Brotherswater and through the fields to Caudlebeck, where the fox tried to cross the road but was turned by traffic. The hounds hunted back through the farmyard, sorting out the twists and turns very well, before heading up the back edge and out to the Terrier Holes, by which point they were about 12 minutes behind.
They lost some momentum in the savins, but persevered to climb out over the top and drop down in through Black Brow to the sheep pens. They were reunited at this point, having lost weight because of poor scenting conditions.
They lost the line below the sheep pens, but threw themselves into the park plantation, where they touched their fox now and again. However, valuable time had been lost and they were gathered up at Bull Crag.

SHARPER HUNT

Dropping in through the brackens to finish the day they found their fox afresh and a much sharper hunt went around to the Terrier Holes, but passed them by to head out to the top of the Dod before turning in for Bull Crag once again.
This hunt then went back through the brackens and round to the Terrier Holes, where this fox went to ground and was left.
Followers appreciated the great hospitality provided at the Golden Fleece, Brough, before they headed to Hilton to see the hounds loosed on to Roman Fell.
The hounds drew Roman Fell and then headed up Swinside Ghyll as far as Christy Bank, where huntsman John Harrison crossed for Swindale Edge. In the event, they drew high out through the reed beds and stone beds of Hilton fell before crossing Scoredale above the mines.
All was quiet until the hounds were past the quarry, at which point a fox was seen on the move on the valley floor by the edge of the beck. Halloed on, they were soon running up the beck to cross to Amber Hill borran, where they marked.
Taken back to continue drawing, they found at Careth when a fox jumped up and a fast hunt went up the valley to the mine before climbing out by the flag pole.
They hunted back into Scoredale at the quarry with the lead hound close to the fox and, as the pack got together, they killed in the open.

Hounds work hard from Harbour Flatt
Saturday, 09 October 2004

THE Elliot family welcomed a large crowd of followers to the Ullswater pack's meet at Harbour Flatt, where hunt chairman Mike Taylforth made a short speech before the hounds moved off to draw, writes TRIMBUSH.
With the mist well down, High Cup bottom was drawn blank, as were the Keisley allotments and the whins at Bow Hall. Drawing on through Great Rundale, the bracken beds on Brownber were drawn blank and so was Rundale itself.
The mist had lifted by this time and so a move was made to the fell and then back through Little Rundale to High Cup Nick.

UNDER PRESSURE

After drawing for more than five hours, the hounds finally found a fox in the Narrowgate stone quarry. It was under pressure from the start and soon went to ground, where it was accounted for.
From Docker Nook Farm, Longsleddale, a litter from above the meet kept the hounds busy for the morning. One was caught above Nether House Farm, with the hounds having done well in the warm and muggy conditions.
They were then drawn up the valley past Kilnstones to Beech Hill, where two foxes were found on the fell above the wood.
The pack split and one half crossed the valley to Yewbarrow, where they ran out of scent. The rest circled Beech Hill and then went away past Wads Howe nearly to Well Foot, where they turned out to Flewscar.
They then hunted sharply back to mark in the intake, where this fox was accounted for.
They proceeded to cross the valley to find Swinklebank Crag held a brace, both of which were hunted to Yewbarrow,
A few hounds took a fox out to Bannisdale and back, but the rest lost their fox. However, they were soon laid on to a view by Ron Barry and, after once again hunting to Yewbarrow Wood, they caught an old dog fox at Middale Farm.

Rain, wind and mist hamper foxhounds
Saturday, 02 October 2004

HEAVY rain over the weekend caused the cancellation of the Monday meet of the Ullswater pack at Beckstones, since the becks were too full to be crossed safely by sheep or hounds, writes TRIMBUSH. The following day was also unfit for hunting for the same reason.
Rosie Lightfoot once again welcomed the pack to Gillside Farm, but the “calm after the storm” proved no good for hunting.
One fox was hunted from Blea Cove and another found in the savins, but the line was quickly lost in both cases.
A good crowd gathered at the Greyhound Inn, Shap, for the Mardale meet, but it was again unfit to hunt because of the rain.
The weather also resulted in the cancellation of the meet at Deepdale Hall, but an attempt was made on the following morning.
The hounds drew Aiken Crag, Latterhow and Braw Crags without finding, but a short hunt then developed on Gavel Pike which took them to St. Sunday.

GATHERED UP

They headed on for Deepdale Hause in the teeth of a gale, but as their pilot turned down wind through Bannerside the scent failed and they were gathered up.
Drawing back through Cold Cove they found in the bracken beds and hunted nicely over Gavel Pike, where the lead hounds got away from the rest and raced their fox down the end of St. Sunday to the Birks, from where they turned in by the Nick Head.
Turning short of Arnison Crag, they checked above Aiken Crag and the rest of the pack caught up.
A slower hunt went through the crag to Wall End, where they found their fox afresh.
After a sharp hunt around the back of the crag they marked to ground and then had their reward.
The meet at Knotthouses was cancelled because of mist, which was down to the busy road between Grasmere and Thirlmere and so would have put both hounds and motorists at risk.

DALSTON MINKHOUNDS MEET AT HESKET-NEW-MARKET
Saturday, 12 June 2004

ONE of the pleasures of rural Cumbria is to walk its byways and riverbanks, well away from urban sprawl, and one of the joys of mink hunting is to be granted access to some private and glorious stretches of the best rivers in the county, writes Herald countryside correspondent MIDGE TODHUNTER.
The Dalston Minkhounds have a young master and huntsman in Steve Blamire who is wildly enthusiastic about his sport, and they meet regularly by invitation of landowners on the River Eden, the Caldew, the Petteril, Ivebeck and Roe Beck.
The pack met at 6pm on a warm evening at the Hesket-new-Market bridge to draw the Caldew down to the Water Meetings where the Calder meets the Caldew and on down to the Sebergham bridge. They had gone just 200 yards when the hounds began to speak to the acrid scent left by a mink and a short hunt ended with them marking into some rock crevices where the mink was left.
They drew on for another hour before again hunting a short way, only to mark up a group of trees. Steve said: “We couldn’t see the mink and we couldn’t get up the trees to chase him out, so we had to leave him. It’s the first time I’ve ever left a mink up a tree, but this was an impossible place and it would have been folly to try.”
Said to be “like an otter in the water and a squirrel in the trees”, mink are not native to this country but have adapted extremely well to a life in rural Britain and it seems they are here to stay much to the consternation of gillies and gamekeepers. They have also been accused of decimating Britain’s water vole population.
They can be found just about anywhere, although they excel in water and tend to set up camp near riverbanks where there is a bountiful supply of fresh fish. But fish are not all they will take they are territorial carnivores and the first to go from an area when they move in are the resident moorhens, followed by ducklings and any type of eggs that are handy. Next goes the contents of tree nests and then, much like the fox, they turn their attention to farm poultry. Baby rabbits are a staple, and not many rabbit catchers put their hand down a rabbit hole these days!
Cumbrian fell hunting enthusiast David Cowen, of Dalston, who was master and huntsman for six years, founded the Dalston pack in 1984. Dalston farmer Trevor Whitfield next housed and hunted them for six years, and remains joint master. For the last eight years the hounds been under the care of Steve Blamire.
In his own words Steve is “addicted to hunting” and hunts two days a week all winter with local foxhound packs. He has even talked his employer into him working just four days a week so he can go hunting every Monday. As the fox hunting season closes, mink hunting begins and Steve’s season often runs through to the cold waters of late November.

EXCELLENT NOSE

The hounds are all drafts from foxhound packs, and seven couple are kept in kennels. There is clearly a dominance of old English foxhound types, with a sprinkling of Welsh foxhound. “We don’t want speed in our hounds,” said Steve. “We need reliability and steadiness, coupled with an excellent nose, and plenty of determination. We’ve tried all sorts, but I’m very proud of the hounds we have now.”
Steve is professional in his approach to hunting hounds, and to running his country. His hounds draw well and comb the riverbanks in an endlessly questing manner as he continually cheers them on with his voice. He is also good on the hunting horn.
“My hounds have excellent board and lodgings, and free medical care, so I expect them to hunt in return, and hunt well,” he said. “We can’t carry passengers. And if I’m prepared to be chest deep in the river, I expect my hounds to be in there with me, not skirting along the riverbank until the action begins.”
He feeds the hounds mostly on tripes from a local abattoir, with additional dog meal. A hound hunting mink will last 14 or 15 seasons, which is unheard of in fox hunting. Steve keeps only bitches as it means they can all go out hunting every day. It also explains why he cheers them on with cries of “come on my lovely ladies”.
During the hunt from Hesket-new-Market, the hounds methodically drew both sides of the river but most of it proved to be blank. Yet somehow blank days do not matter when mink hunting. It is such a pleasure to be out on one of the great British rivers on balmy early summer evening.
Steve said: “We’ve not seen many mink, but we’ve enjoyed our time in this beautiful setting and there are plenty of people in this country who will never have an experience like this in their lives. I’ll never be rich doing this, but I truly enjoy what I do and feel very lucky to have the choice to do what makes my heart sing. Others can have their big salaries I want to enjoy my life in the countryside, and the closer I am to nature the better I like it.”

Pack gets hundredth fox to end season
Saturday, 17 April 2004

EASTER weekend brought hundreds of hunting enthusiasts to the Lake District to witness the fell packs see out the season.
On Saturday, the hounds of the Ullswater pack moved off from the Patterdale Hotel after enjoying the usual warm hospitality. It was an overcast and muggy morning as they drew the Grisedale Valley.
They had drawn through as far as Bleaberry before a fox was seen, but when they arrived at where it had gone they could hardly own the line.
None of the foxes hunted seemed to want to travel far and all went to ground in the notoriously bad borrans dotted over Bleaberry.
Scenting on the stone beds was particularly bad, and at one point the hounds were gathered up and taken on by Red Tarn to Catsty Cam, where the oldest dog hound in the pack found a tightly sitting fox in the face and put him out at the crag.
A hunt then got under way out to the top of Catsty, but not at a fast pace. However, things improved as they went around Red Tarn under the summit of Helvellyn and they were able to get on much better.
It was not long before they crossed Striding Edge to Bleaberry, where they soon slowed down. The day ended not long after with yet another fox left in a safe place.
Monday dawned sunny and warm, making it just the right sort of morning for a walk on the fells — a complete contrast to last year, when it rained throughout the day. As a result, a huge crowd met at the White Lion, Patterdale, where the warm hospitality provided was again much appreciated.
As always, the route from the meet took the pack over the Goldrill bridge and through the Place Fell gate, from where the hounds cast themselves high out to Grey Crag and then on through Betty Brae to Birkfell. A fox was found there above the earth.

GATHERED UP

This fox brought the hounds out to Bleaberry Knott before returning to the front and Birk Fell and Birk Fell Slack, where it soon became apparent there was hardly any scent. After persevering through to Long Crag and back, they were gathered up.
The hounds were then drawn on over Scalehow Beck to the end of Sleet Fell and all was quiet until Nettleslack, where they marked a fox in an earth. It was quickly bolted and hunted hard around Sleet Fell before dropping in by the vicarage and the fields, where they checked.
However, they regained the line on the beck edge and hunted up the water to Nettleslack House, where they took to the fell once again.
Turning back down the fell to the find, the lead hounds were not far behind their fox and they soon marked again. They caught their hundredth fox ofd the season soon after.
The Ullswater hounds are now on lamb worrying call out until the end of May.

Ullswater hounds drop in at kennels of Coniston pack
Saturday, 10 April 2004

THE Iredale family once again welcomed the Ullswater pack to Greenbank Farm, Patterdale, where a large number of followers appreciated the hospitality provided.
THE Iredale family once again welcomed the Ullswater pack to Greenbank Farm, Patterdale, where a large number of followers appreciated the hospitality provided.
On moving off, the hounds were drawn towards Aiken Crag, where a few struck a drag high out which took them through the top of Arnison Crag and then on into the park, where they lost the line under Black Crag.
As they were being gathered up at the Nick Head they regained the line and hunted slowly through into Cold Cove and on to Light Stones, where this hunt moved up a gear. Dropping down the cove to Latterhaw Crag they were going well, and as they passed out of sight the followers had only their music to indicate where they were heading.
When next seen, the hounds were climbing out above the sand beds to the crags, where their fox had laid up. However, he soon made a move when they tried the crag and a sharp hunt went up the valley to Ernest Crag.
The hounds then headed on through Link Cove and on to Greenhow End before disappearing from view on Fairfield.
The hunters were then out of touch for a long time, but the hounds were eventually located down the Scandale Valley at the Coniston hunt kennels, where Coniston huntsman Michael Nicholson gathered them up.
From the Travellers Rest, Glenridding, the hounds struck a drag in Myer's Cove which took them round into Blea Cove, where they put off the fox above the quarry.
Running back to the Nab high out, the fox turned short in the face before making back to Blea Cove, only to retrace his steps to the Nab. He then went to ground in the borran.
On bolting from the rocks, he twisted and turned on the face of the Nab before the hounds put him out. A good hunt then went down the beck to the Hag.
He headed on to Lanty's Tarn, where he went to ground again. He was bolted and caught from there.

Quiet day from Martindale Green
Saturday, 03 April 2004

A QUIET day was had after the Ullswater pack met at Martindale Green, with the hounds being drawn through Winter Crag, Raven Crag and Yew Crag, apart from a handful which cast over Beda Fell and found a fox in Boredale.
These few hunted the fox over the valley to Place Fell, where they eventually ran it to ground at Foul’s Earth.
As the rest of the pack had drawn on through Commonside to Heck Crag without finding they were taken to the mark, but it is a notoriously difficult place from which to bolt a fox and so he was given best.
The hounds drew on down the valley as far as Nettleslack and then were walked back to Boredale Head to Draw Beda Fell before going back down to the meet to finish.
Thick mist and driving rain forced the cancellation of the meet at the Travellers Rest, Glenridding, but the hounds were back in action again at Dale Head. A fox was marked under Swine Crag, but nothing could be done there so they were drawn on to Ullman Crag, where a fox bolted only to run down the fell breast, over the fell wall and straight into a badger sett, where it was left.
The hounds then struck a drag under the Black Wood in Rampsgill which slowly took them on a complete circuit of the wood before they got closer to him.
A better hunt went out through Rampsgill Head to Riggindale, where they were found marking at Kidsty Pike.
The fox soon bolted from this spot, but scenting was very poor and this hunt fell apart a short time later.

Foxes prove elusive for Ullswater hounds
Saturday, 20 March 2004

FOLLOWING the Ullswater pack’s meet at Gillside Farm, Glenridding, hounds drew a blank at Myers Cove Nab before finding a fox in Blea Cove which ran back to the Nab high out.
Hunting away at a steady pace, they crossed the wall on to Braesteads Brow, which they were soon through to drop towards the valley floor. Hitting the fields by Dobson’s Hoggest, they were soon over the beck to Elm Howe and climbing up into Blind Cove.
They quickly climbed into St. Sunday Crag, where most lost the scent and were gathered up to draw back up the Glenridding Valley.

ON THE LINE

A fox had been about on Catsty Cam, but the hounds were a long way behind until Robin Lightfoot saw it leaving Kepple Cove and laid the pack on to the line. A very fast hunt then went down by the chimney to Haystack and then on down the beck to the mine.
They went down the valley nearly to Gillside before the fox crossed back over the beck to climb out by High Rake Cottages to Mossdale.
When next seen, the lead hounds and not many of them were running over Glencoyne Beck by the road, after which they headed on into the park low down. However, scent then ran out and they were gathered up on Park Brow.
From the meet at Hartsop, the hounds struck a drag by Pasture Beck which took them on a twisting route up into Grey Crag.
Unfortunately, only a handful got away with the fox when he got up, with the main body casting back to the valley floor.
However, as this hunt went up the top for the Thornthwaite monument and then back under the crags in Threshwaite Mouth the rest of the pack heard those on the line and headed for the cry.
Hunting down the Troutbeck Valley just under High Street the hounds were very bad to see in the snowy conditions, but hunters kept in touch with them through Blue Ghyll and on to Park Quarry.
They then turned back out for Kentmere Ill Bell, where they were picked up in near Arctic conditions.
All was quiet as they drew back down Hayeswater, by Fox Bield, as was Prison Crag and all the way through Calf Gates, Slinger Wood and Fall Crags to Beckstones Crag, where the day ended.

FELL TOPS FROZEN HARD ON JOINT MEET DAY AT GRASMERE
Saturday, 13 March 2004

MR. and Mrs. Peter Bland welcomed the joint packs of the Ullswater and Coniston foxhounds to Knotthouses, Grasmere, and their hospitality was appreciated by all.
With the fell tops still frozen hard, hounds were drawn through Greenhead Ghyll then on for Forestside, where a fox was well found in the crags just short of Alcock Tarn.
Under pressure from the start, the fox had no choice but to run in for Elephant Wood and Hollens, where he ran the road for a while causing hounds their first check of the day. However, they persevered and hunted slowly over the road to the old tip where their fox had gone to ground in a drain, from where it was later dispatched.
It was a lovely day for a walk in the sun, which is what it amounted to, given the scenting conditions, but hounds did well on a fox seen above Hart Head when they were laid on.
Although soon stringing out, the lead hounds pushed on well through Rydal Park to Scandale, where they were found marking at Brock Crag. Nothing could be done at the mark and, as scenting was not improving and the day was getting on, a decision was made to end the meet.

SHARP CONTRAST

The weather on Wednesday from Beckstones was in sharp contrast to the bright, warm sunshine of Monday, when low cloud, rain, snow and high winds made it a miserable day to be on the tops.
However, a fox was seen on the move at Fall Crags by Bill Braithwaite, but hounds could hardly own the line when they went to the “Holloa” and proceeded to feather the line up Angle Tarn Beck to Angle Tarn, then on to Buck Crag where scent failed altogether.
Cast back towards Heck Crag, hounds marked at a borran and, as the weather worsened, the fox eventually bolted, taking hounds inbank for the bottom of the crag and the fell wall, below which they marked again and from where their fox was bolted and caught.
Peter Wybergh, MFH, brought his Cumberland Farmers’ hounds to Whitbysteads Farm, Askham, for the annual foot meet with the Ullswater hounds, courtesy of Tom Lowther.
Hounds left the meet to draw the woods but all was quiet as it was over Helton Fell to Heltondale. A fox was roused from the rush beds high out in Swarthbeck Ghyll and coursed into Fusedale, where hounds had their reward by Cote Farm.
A fox on the move below Swarthfell was hunted nicely though the field by Sharrow Cottages to Auterstone Wood, then on for the whins where they ran into hikers which caused a check but, lifted on, they were soon running through Barton Park for Park Foot and Ellerbeck.
With the fox seen running towards lambing ewes and hounds losing ground by the minute, they were stopped and gathered up.

Frosty conditions prove tricky for foxhounds
Saturday, 06 March 2004

PETE and Bev Iredale welcomed the Ullswater pack to Greenbank Farm, Patterdale, on a frosty, dry and bright morning which saw a fox quickly on the move in Cold Cove.
It took the hounds to Black Crag and then into the Grizedale Valley, where the scent failed soon after they got on to frozen ground.
A fresh fox was moved above Dr. Jim’s and this went back through Blind Cove to Harrison Crags, Thornhow End and Black Crag.
About 10 hounds eventually went through the Nick Head to Aiken Crag and Wall End, and then over the Deepdale Beck before climbing out through the park for Low Wood End. This slow hunt ran out of steam altogether in Dovedale.
On such bright and cold days it is interesting to see how odd hounds can often hunt a line better than several, and a good example of this occurred during a hunt from Deepdale Hall. The hounds were put into Low Wood End and dragged up to a fox laid above Cowbridge. They hunted as a pack for the first 20 minutes as they went out by Cora Crag into the Deepdale Valley, but stayed high out through the top before disappearing back into Dovedale in the Ghyll Crags area.
Hunting back down the Low Wood above Hartsop Hall they began to get strung out, and by the time they reached Low Wood End there were only 10 hounds that could carry the scent into the park. They hunted down to Wall End, where they crossed the beck.
Although strung out over half a mile of fell by this time, these 10 hounds made their way by Braw Crags to Bannerside, briefly touching the top of Gavel Pike before turning through the top of Bannerside to Grey Crag.
They headed on under Deepdale Hause to Cofa Pike, where they disappeared from view. Having run around Fairfield to Tongue Ghyll, these hounds evidently hunted out over Great Rigg to Rydal Head, which they crossed to reappear behind Dove Crag and hunt into Hart Crag in Link Cove.
They were difficult to pick out in the snow, but were spotted crossing Link Hause to Greenhow End, at which point they again disappeared from sight into Deepdale Head. Scent then failed altogether in the near Arctic conditions.

TALLY OF TWO AT DALEHEAD BYE DAY HUNT
Saturday, 28 February 2004

FROM the Ullswater Foxhounds' kennels meet, a fox was moved on Harrison Crag and hunted sharply through Blind Cove.
Dropping for Elm Howe, it circled back under the crag, where more hounds were laid on. Scent was never good but hounds threw themselves forward to Thornhow End and a slightly better hunt went in through the park to Deer Howe where scent appeared to run out altogether.
Gathered up on Thornhow End, hounds put up what looked like the hunted fox and, again, a sharp hunt went in for Thornhow buildings. However, they were brought to their noses in the fields and took time before hunting the line out by the pheasant pen then on by Lanty’s Tarn where they disappeared out of sight.
By the time followers caught up, the hunt was over as the fox had been caught at Ghyllside Farm. Gathered up and drawn on up the Grizedale Valley, several short hunts started but none were brought to any conclusion.
A bye day was put in at Dalehead on a very frosty morning but hounds began dragging straight away from Calf Close through Nab End into the head of Rampsgill, where their fox got up.
A better hunt then came back through Rest Dod and into Bannerdale, where a few hounds split off and ran to Heck Crag then over into Boredale before bringing their fox back by Commonside to Dalehead, where it took refuge in the farm buildings and was despatched.
The main body of the pack meanwhile had turned out through Rest Dod and the head of Rampsgill to The Knott, and then over High Street to the head of Riggingdale. Next seen, they were running through Caspel Gate then in through Roughsides to Wallend and across the valley to Flake How.
The hunt then came up Randale, where the fox was headed back into Whelter and things seemed to fall apart for a while. However, a handful of hounds stuck to their fox and eventually hunted down to Benty How where they marked their fox to ground, with it being accounted for shortly after.
The Inn on the Lake, Glenridding, offered a welcome to the hunt and a large following appreciated the hospitality. Leaving the meet by Eagle Farm, hounds were soon feathering a line above Westside which took them under Nab End into Bleacove where two foxes got up.
One was hunted by to The Nab where he was headed by hikers at Myers Beck, allowing hounds to gain ground and quickly run him to ground under The Nab, from where he was bolted and caught.
In very poor scenting conditions, another fox was hunted all around the savins and mines before going out by Sheffield Pike and Black Crag before a few hounds brought him back to the mines, which he circled again before an odd hound marked him to ground above Sulphate How.
On bolting, a very good hunt went down the valley past the mines to Ghyllside, Westside and Keldas. Next seen, hounds were running well under Raven Crag and through Hall Bank to the waterfall in Grizedale Beck, where they turned him towards the water and Patterdale Hall, where they killed their fox

TALLY OF FIVE FOXES AT SWINDALE MEET
Saturday, 21 February 2004

FOLLOWING the hospitality provided by the Golden Fleece, at Brough, the Ullswater Foxhounds were taken to draw High Ewebank Plantation, where they were soon hunting a line.
It eventually took them out of the trees and through the allotments to just short of the Tan Hill road, where they marked.
On bolting, the fox took hounds on a circular route by Slip House, Buckles Farm and over the road to Gilleses and Barranthwaite Hall.
Running nearly to the A66, they then hunted back by Scroggy Bank and Bleathgill Farm, heading back towards the trees. However, hounds had got very strung out and scent was failing fast and the line was lost below the mast.
From the Swindale meet, one of a brace found by Starling Ghyll was hunted through the fields by Tailbert Farm to Tailbert Ghyll, where it was marked to grounds, bolted and caught.
A good hunt went from Whinny Crag to Gouther Crag, where the pack split, with a dozen hounds crossing the valley by Truss Gap to run out to Naddle.
They were seen into the long plantation then went out of sight into the forest. They reappeared by the long plantation, still hunting well, and ran down the Naddle Valley for Mirkside and then the Frith.
They crossed the concrete road to run to Raw Foot, then over the beck to Heggle, where they turned right for Rosgill and Rosgill Wood, finally marking their fox to ground at Shap Abbey.
The original fox, meanwhile, was being hunted through Yew Close to the waterfall, where the pack crossed the beck.
Running on under Nab Crags, they crossed Hobgrumble Ghyll to Black Bells, where the fox stopped in the crag face, from where it was eventually moved and caught by the hounds in below.

BRACE MARKED

A brace were marked at Swindale Foot, one of which was accounted for while the other bolted, taking hounds by Mullender, Truss Gap and Gouther Crag then back by the filter house to Swindale Foot. There it was marked and, on bolting, it ran straight back to Gouther Crag, where it had to be left.
The fifth fox to be caught was found on top at Swindale Foot and accounted for at Gouther Crag.

HOWTOWN MEET

Another excellent hound hunt was witnessed at Howtown after David and Mrs. Baldry welcomed the hunt to the Howtown Hotel. Two foxes were found at Brock Cragg and both were hunted separately to the forest, where scent failed for all but a few which hunted their fox by Gowk Hill and the springs to Dry Dod Ghyll and Brock Crag, where the pack was reunited.
A slow, fascinating hunt then completed a circle under the crag before heading for Swarthfell, turning in by Mellguards and Howtown to the Coombs.
Hunting slowly over Steel End, they went by Ivy Crag then around the head of Fusedale to mark their fox just short of Dry Dod ghyll, from where it was bolted and caught.

FROST, RAIN AND MIST HIT HUNTING
Saturday, 14 February 2004

CEC and Helen Coxon welcomed the Ullswater pack back to the Stag Inn, Dufton, where their hospitality was much appreciated.
After the hounds were loosed at Bow Hall, Keisley allotments were drawn on the way to High Cup Nick, where all was quiet.
They swung round for the source of Little Rundle and then headed on for Great Rundale, but all was quiet until a single hound, Liltet, roused a fox from a stone bed high out above Great Rundale. Although the pack was lifted forward, however, the fox was too far in front and scenting was too poor for any good work to be done.
Jimmy and Michelle Hodgson hosted their ever popular meet at Askham. On moving off, the hounds drew Butterwick Crag, Sceugh and Widewath without finding and it was not until they reached Heltondale that a fox was seen about the Whins. A hard frost made things difficult in the fields and hunting the heel line was the easier option.

MARKED

However, taken to where the fox had last been seen they moved it on the beck edge and hunted well up through the Whins and then out into Brownbeck before swinging back for the Whins and Heltondale, where they marked to ground above Keld Head. Under pressure from the bolt, this fox only just made the Whins where they marked again, and it was accounted for soon after.
The Sandwick meet was cancelled because of snow and frost, but a good crowd attended the meet at Walloway and, as usual, they were well entertained by Alf Edmondson. However, the hounds had to be taken home because of heavy rain and the threat of mist engulfing the A66, which it did by noon.
Sandwick was pencilled in for the following bye day, but thIs meet again had to be cancelled because there was too much water about. The same happened with the Lawn meet at Dalemain.
Mr. and Mrs. Dent welcomed a good crowd to Swindale Grange, Brough, with their usual hospitality. Helbeck was drawn from there, with the hounds working a fox very briefly before it bolted from a rock pile of its own accord and took them on a circuit of the wood to the fox tower. They climbed out over Mount Ida to run out for the Black Allotments and then turned back for Helbeck and Malplacket.
They checked frequently in the gale force winds as they hunted over the Musgrave lane and on to Middle Fell, from where they turned in to run back to the Musgrave lane and Helbeck, where this hunt finished at the Bluestones.

HOUNDS ACCOUNT FOR FOX AFTER BOLTING IT UNAIDED
Saturday, 07 February 2004

SILVER Point held a fox which soon took Ullswater Foxhounds up into Birkfell, where they split, but both hunts came into Rookin Ghyll above Side Farm, Patterdale, where the hunt and followers had been welcomed earlier by hunt chairman Mike Taylforth.
Both hunts appeared to have ground to a halt but, on being held forward, a line was regained through the ghyll to the house, where hounds went up a gear as they dropped in for Crook-a-Beck Wood.
They went on for Beckstones, where they crossed the Menet Ing Bridge to follow the beck to Robs How and they re-crossed the water to the wet bottoms.
It took them a long time to work out the line to the fell bottom, but when they did they went better through Out How Ghyll to Fall Crags then on by Lingy Crag to Thorn Knott, where they marked.

BAD CHECK

On bolting, the fox dropped in for the beck then once again climbed out for Slinger Wood, where hounds suffered a large check and took a lot of time. However, they soon got going through for Beckstones Crag and the pipe track, then made their way up through the crag and disappeared over the top.
They were next seen under Heck Crag, in Bannerdale, making their way around far Buck Crag, where their pilot had stopped in a small crag at the bottom and, completely unaided, hounds bolted their fox and caught him shortly afterwards.

HARTRIGG HUNT

Mick Booth and his family saw the hounds off from his Hartrigg Farm, in Kentmere, on quite a warm, muggy morning. Two foxes were moved on Rainsbarrow, one of which was hunted through to Ill Bell and back under Starry Crag to Lambfold Quarry, where they marked.
Leaving this fox, they were drawn back down the valley through the Grassings, where they struck the line of the second fox just as it was seen by Peter Martin whose halloa soon had them running in above Hartrigg and then back under Rainsbarrow, over the Lambfold Quarry and out to Steel Rigg.
Hunting on to Ill Bell and beyond, they were next seen climbing out for the mist and Troutbeck!
They weren’t gone too long before Steve Wooff heard them coming back out of Troutbeck, heading for Rainsbarrow where they were eventually heard and seen dropping in by Starry Crag for Lambfold Quarry, where once again they marked.
This time an attempt was made to bolt the fox and eventually he did and a storming hunt went down the Kentmere Valley nearly to Ireland Wood.
The pack then re-crossed the valley by Hartrigg to climb out by Guards Wood for the Grassings and Rainsbarrow, where the fox found sanctuary very briefly in Cauldron Quarry.
However, he was pushed out and across the road to the old dam where hounds marked, eventually killing their fox under Lambfold Quarry.

Outstanding hunt from Hartsop Hall
Saturday, 31 January 2004

A SMALL but knowledgeable band of followers were lucky enough to witness what could very well go down as the Ullswater pack’s best hunt of the season following a meet at Hartsop Hall which was rather extended because of the generosity of Jimmy Hodgson.
Within five minutes of being cast up into Low Wood the hounds had feathered a line up to Cora Crag and roused a fox which proceeded to to drop down to the meet. It then crossed the valley for Caiston Glen by the farm buildings.
The hounds settled well as they followed, crossing the foot bridges as they ran for Windy Corner on the Kirkstone road. Seen safely over the road, they climbed out and around Long Lot before setting sail for Caudle Beck and New Close.
They ran around the Dod end about half way up, from where they dropped in for the sheep pens at Hartsop. There they suffered a brief check, but were soon on through Slinger Wood and dropping in for the wet bottoms by Hartsop Fold.

COMPLETE HALT

Hunting to the beck at Rob’s How, they turned down the water to the Menet Ing bridge, which they crossed. They were then into the fields by Deepdale Beck, where sheep foil brought them to their noses and then to a complete halt, at which point they needed help.
Their pilot was obviously making back for Low Wood, and a forward cast into the end of the wood soon had them running above Cow Bridge and through to Ghyll Crags. They then dropped in for the park and the sheep pens below Hogget Ghyll.
They crossed the beck, climbed up to Bull Crag and ground up to the top of the crag, after which they levelled off towards the Dod end and Terrier Holes.
On reaching the Dod end, they dropped in through the forest and again crossed the foot bridges over the Caiston and Kirkstone becks before running to Windy Corner. Their fox had tried to cross at this point, but was headed.
A check at Caudle Beck farm was then sorted out and the hounds crossed the road by the Brotherswater Hotel. They climbed out to New Close and headed for Hartsop once again, but instead dropped to the road and the lake edge.
They hunted back around the head of Brotherswater through the reed beds to Low Wood, where they marked their fox to ground above the track. He was bolted and caught from there.
This was an outstanding hound hunt which lasted for about 90 minutes. Conditions were less than ideal and they were only touched twice when checked through no fault of their own.

Interesting hunt around Haweswate r
Saturday, 17 January 2004

A HUGE following was disappointed when the hounds of the Ullswater pack failed to produce a hunt from Martindale Green. They drew all the available country, but scenting was so poor that every drag fizzled out before they got up to the fox.
One very promising drag began on the Nab and took the hounds all the way around to Ullman Crag and then on under Swine Crags for Buck Crag, where they climbed up on to the face and searched every niche.
It was not to be, however, and they drew down the valley to the meet to bring the day to an end. The predicted storm followed them down the valley, which was probably the main reason there had been no scent.
The next hunt day dawned wet and wild, and it was not a difficult decision to cancel the meet at the White Lion Hotel, Patterdale particularly since there had been about 3.5in of rain during the previous 36 hours.
From the Queens Head, Askham, a lot of ground was drawn before a fox was found around the Bower, on Swarth Fell. It was hunted to Swarthbeck Ghyll before running back to Loup Knott, where the pack moved up a couple of gears.
This fox then turned in for Auterstone Wood and, with the pack viewing him into the trees, it was only a matter of time before they killed by Sharrow Cottages.
A fox from Barton Park ran the fields to Thwaite Hill before dropping to the lake shore at Sharrow Bay. He ran the shore for a while before turning out for the fields to Swarthbeck Ghyll. He reached the fell and made his way back through to Long Crag with the pack hunting well, having got “tuned in” through the fields.
However, they had a bad check on leaving Long Crag where their fox had climbed a difficult face, but were lifted on past Loup Knott to run back for Swarthbeck Ghyll and then on for Bonscale and Dry Ghyll to Brock Crag, where they marked.
This fox bolted before anybody could get to them and dropped straight in for Cote Farm, after which he ran the fields to Mellguards and the Howtown Hotel. He was eventually caught near the outdoor centre.
The Haweswater Hotel meet produced an interesting hunt in bad conditions after a fox was found below Great Crag. He ran Querness Ghyll to the lake shore and then down the lake under the hotel before climbing back out for the forest. He then swung back for Querness Ghyll and Mardale Banks.
Just short of Whiteacre he dropped to the shore once again and ran all the way to Woodfell Ghyll, where he went briefly to the fell. However, he soon recrossed the road to the lake head, where he crossed for Dudderwick.
The hounds went out of sight for a while in Riggindale and were next seen coming out of Caspel Gate and down the top of Dudderwick. They dropped down to cross the intake under Harter Fell before running to the plantation and Branstree, where the line was all but lost. This fox was given best soon after.

Hounds turn and twist with great accuracy
Saturday, 10 January 2004

ANN and Eddie Pool entertained the Ullswater pack at Glebe House, Patterdale, and their hospitality was much appreciated on a damp morning.
Unfortunately, the mist was down to Elm Howe up the Grisedale Valley the intended draw and the glass was still falling, so it was decided conditions were unfit for hunting and the day was cancelled.
There was some comfort for followers two days later, with a hard frost, bright sun and clear skies as Rosie Lightfoot hosted the meet at Gillside Farm, Glenridding.
There was very little scent in the morning as a fox was hunted fitfully to Seldom Seen, Heron Pike and then out by Sheffield Pike to Rough Sides, Glenridding, where the scent failed altogether.

FAINTEST LINE

Another fox had been seen around Glencoyne and this customer was dragged all through Mossdale and Glenridding Wood and out on to the Dod, from where the faintest of lines took the hounds through Rough Sides to the Glenridding mines. At this point they started to speak as they headed under Haystacks and into the savins.
Nobody was forward to see the hounds at work, but it must have been a sharp hunt as they were soon seen marking to ground in the snow just short of Sulphate How.
Just as this fox bolted, the snow storm which had been threatening for some time arrived and brought with it a breast high scent. The hounds could not have hunted any faster and they were soon through the savins and into Rough Sides.
They then hunted on for the Rake, where they dropped down by High Row for the village and crossed the main road at the green with hardly a check.
Running through the grounds of the Inn on the Lake, they hit the lake shore and turned for the steamer pier and Jenkin Field, swimming Glenridding Beck on the way.

TRAFFIC

The fox probably got headed at St. Patrick’s Well as he made for Hall Bank and, as a result, had to cross the road nearer to the village than he would have liked. This was the only time the hounds were touched as they were helped through the traffic and on for Keldas.
They were in top gear again as they headed by Westside and through the fields for the meet. A check at the Mires was soon sorted out and they ran on above the caravans, heading along the track to the beck, which they crossed with difficulty as this fox was beginning to turn short.
By the time they had hunted up to the Greenside road some vehicles had caught up and followers were treated to some good close quarter hound work as they turned and twisted on the line with impressive accuracy.
They ran under the screes before turning in for the beck, which they crossed, and then headed up into the plantation.
They recrossed the beck under the youth hostel, hunted over the road by the bridge and ran up on to the spoil heaps, where they marked their fox to ground above the powder house late in the afternoon. The fox was despatched soon after.
Followers were reminded that the weekend with the Border, at Otterburn, is to be held on 13th and 14th March, rather than 27th and 28th March as originally planned.

Beautiful hound work during Roehead meet
Saturday, 03 January 2004

RON and Liz Barry hosted the Ullswater pack’s popular meet at Roehead, Pooley Bridge, and dispensed hospitality to a large midweek following.
The first fox of the day was killed after a very sharp hunt from the top of Ellerbeck Ghyll during which it was coursed down the fell into the Park Foot campsite and then on by the road to Ellerbeck.
Finding in Barton Park, the hounds ran back by Park Foot, Ellerbeck and Roehead to Heughscar and High Winder, where the scent failed. They were gathered up and taken back by Moor Divock to Swarthfell to draw again.

FEATHERING

Beautiful hound work saw them feather a line through Long Crag into Loup Knott, where they roused a fox and ran him hard in by the Bower and Auterstone Wood to the whins, where they killed by the cottages.
A short-running customer was left at the Bower in a difficult place, but as the hounds drew on by Swarthfell they struck a drag which took them into Swarthbeck Ghyll, where they moved their fox.
They went well to Mellguards, checked briefly in the fields at Cote Farm and then settled again to run the beck up Fusedale before coming back by Greendod Ghyll to Brock Crag.
They struggled on the stones for a while but were soon on to Dry Ghyll. Crossing the High Street trod, they went in for Brownbeck to Scales Farm and then ran into the fields, where they suffered a long check.
However, they eventually worked their way across the valley to High House, where scent failed late in the day.
Having been cancelled the previous month, the meet at the Howtown Hotel was rearranged and this saw the hounds drawn up the Fusedale Valley for Lug Crag.
A fox was laid tight in the bracken, but he was eventually roused and, after a short circuit of Pikeawassa, got his bearings and set sail for High Street by Gowk Hill.
The hounds then went out of sight in the mist and were heard marking in Long Grain, high out in Fordingdale.
Only half the hounds were at the mark and, as they caught their fox from the bolt, the rest were killing another on the shore of Haweswater.
They had hunted to Lad Crag, found their fox afresh and hunted to the shoreline at Measand Beck, where they marked and drew their fox unaided.

ALL THE SIGNS

The hounds were then gathered up and drawn through the White Bog, where they found and hunted nicely in by Brock Crag and Bonscale to Swarthbeck Ghyll.
They then turned in for the fields at Raven Crag, where they crossed the road for the lake shore to finish, showing all the signs of having caught their fox.

FRUSTRATING TWO DAYS AT GRASMERE
Saturday, 20 December 2003

THERE was a large gathering of followers when the Ullswater pack met at the Howtown Hotel, Ullswater, where the traditional stirrup cup was presented by Mrs. Baldry, but hunting had to be called off and the hounds taken home because of heavy rain.
Peter Bland welcomed the pack to Knotthouses Farm, Grasmere, for what turned out to be two frustrating days of hunting. The first hunt on each day proved short-lived. On the first day, the first fox found quickly went to ground and had to be left.
A fox from Dry Ghyll subsequently took the hounds through Seat Sandal to Hause Moss and then out into the mist on Great Rigg. It then headed back through for Grisedale Tarn and out into the mist once again. The hounds were out of sight for some time and the outcome of this hunt remained unclear.
The first hunt on the second day saw the fox run to the village of Grasmere, where the hounds had to be stopped.
The next hunt went out of Greenhead Ghyll over Great Rigg and through for Grisedale Tarn, where the hounds again disappeared into the mist. The outcome of this hunt was also unknown.
From the meet at Burnbanks, a litter in the savins kept the pack busy until about half the hounds took one to Whelter. It was then lost, but a fresh fox was put off and this ran to Castle Crag and Dudderwick.
This fox proceeded to cross the head of the lake to Branstree, after which only a handful of hounds could hunt out to the head of Hop Ghyll and Artlecrag Pike, where they put him off afresh and hunted hard back to the head of the lake and killed him.

VALUABLE TIME LOST

Meanwhile, the rest of the pack had hunted a fox by Burnbanks and Littlewater to Ireland Wood and the Howes, where the scent failed after a fresh fox intervened. Valuable time was lost in righting them.
Reunited at Whelter, the pack drew on until they marked at Benty Howe. Two foxes were then bolted and caught late in the day.
From Mardale Head, a fox from Chapel Hill ran up Riggindale to Rough Side, where fresh foxes caused the pack to split. As a result, nothing came of the day's early hunts.
Finding afresh through Roughside, the hounds ran well over Dudderwick and then up on to Harter Fell, where they marked at the High Holes earth.
This fox eventually bolted after the main body of the pack had been taken away, but the hound Ringwood was on hand to run it to ground much lower down Harter Fell. The fox was bolted from there and the reunited pack killed at the head of the lake.
The hounds were then drawn up Riggindale to Caspel Gate, Long Stile, Short Stile and Salepots before a fox jumped up in front of them on Kidsty Pike. It was quickly run to ground and accounted for late in the day.

Productive day for hounds at Low Hullock Howe
Saturday, 13 December 2003

THE hounds and followers of the Ullswater pack were welcomed to Low Hullock Howe Farm by Carl and Ruth Walters, and the many people present enjoyed their hospitality before the hounds moved off to draw the Sceugh.
They soon found a fox above Beckfoot and this only ran as far as Widewath Mill before going to ground, but it soon bolted of its own accord. It ran through several fields full of stock and the hounds struggled to hold the line, but eventually they marked at an earth by the village of Helton.
Having bolted, this fox was hunted hard back to the mill and then down the ghyll to Beckfoot and Butterwick, where the hounds marked to ground once again and he was accounted for.
The hounds had drawn as far as Willdale before they found again. A fox was then coursed to ground and accounted for after the hounds had hunted a fresh fox away from the earth and over the Tongue to the edge of Cawdale.
This hunt proceeded to head back through Willdale at pace before climbing out by Ugly Ghyll and out of sight above Drybarrows. The hounds were next seen in the whins above the dam, marking their fox to ground.
He was also accounted for and a disturbed fox took the hounds on a hunt which went by Burnbanks, Littlewater and the Howes, where they crossed the road at Crossgates for Low Hullock Howe, Ghyll Head and Butterwick Crag.

GROWING DARKNESS

The day was getting on by this point and it was in growing darkness that they hunted out on to the Sceugh before crossing the road at Beckfoot to run the fields towards Knipe. However, sheep foil brought them to their noses and they were gathered up in the dark.
Foxes were hard to find at Glencoyne after a wild and wet night, but one was eventually marked to ground at the far end of the draw above Bill Riley’s. On bolting, he was hunted hard through for the pheasant pen, where he turned in for the fields, which caused the hounds to check.
He then crossed the road for Aira Force, where he was hunted over the bridge for Gowbarrow and Hind Crag. Running on for Yew Crag, the hounds turned in for the plantation and then back for Hind Crag, only to repeat the circuit to Yew Crag.
This time, however, they dropped in for Lyulph’s Tower and ran the fields to Aira Force, where they again hunted over the bridge.
This fox was probably headed on the Park Brow road and ran up to the car park. It then came back down the beck edge to the force itself, where two hikers unwittingly headed it and the line was lost on the beck edge.
With the weather worsening by the minute, the hounds were then collected and taken home.
Mr. and Mrs. Harwood welcomed the pack to Kirkgate and their hospitality was much appreciated. The hounds then had a very busy but fruitless day, finding many foxes but being unable to bring any pressure to bear because of the poor scenting conditions.

MEET TAKES SECOND PLACE TO RUGBY
Saturday, 06 December 2003

FROM the meet at Thornthwaite Hall, the hounds of the Ullswater pack were loosed into the Frith, where they soon found a fox.
However, the rotting vegetation generally found in the woods and coverts at this time of year made scenting very difficult for the hounds and this was the case all day. They ran well in the open, but then came to a complete standstill in the trees.
After a scrappy start they were gathered up and drawn up the Naddle Valley as far as Hop Ghyll, after which they headed back down the fell to Rosgill Common, where they found again. However, this sharp hunt suffered the same fate as the others when they reached the Frith.
The next meet was at Greyhound Inn, Shap, from where the hounds were vanned to the Wet Sleddale reservoir.
A fox was marked in on Great Side and, after bolting, it was hunted well by Sleddale Hall and Stackhouse Plantation to Ralfland Forest, where the hounds put the pressure on. When next seen, they were going under Gouter Crag in the Swindale Valley. Hunting on, they went by Kennel Crag and Dog Crag to mark their fox under Outlaw Crag, where he was accounted for.
After a long draw up the Mosedale Valley and Brunt Tongue and then down to Saddle Crags, the hounds were drawing Tod Crag when a fox got up in front of them. A good hunt went down the valley to Great Side, where they turned back up on good terms with their fox.
He made it back to Tod Crag and went to ground in the borran, from where he was bolted and caught.

LOOSED ON TIME

The Mardale shepherds’ meet came a poor second to the Rugby World Cup final and rightly so but with a job to do the hounds were loosed on time. There was a fair following despite the rugby match and the crowd swelled as the day went on.
All was quiet through Branstree, but a slow drag high out in Hop Ghyll resulted in the emergence of a fox which came off Artle Crag Pike. Two hounds brought it back to Hop Ghyll high out.
The rest of the pack was soon with them and they ran well for Selside Pike and Black Bells, where a few hounds split off on a fox which took them down the Swindale Valley. However, these few eventually ran out of scent.
The main body of the pack enjoyed better fortune, going through Captain Welter Bog at top pace before heading in by the Mosedale quarry and on through for Longsleddale and Buckbarrow Crag.
They killed their fox at the Chimney Hole borran.

Ullswater foxhound sticks to the line
Saturday, 29 November 2003

PETER and Bev Iredale again welcomed the Ullswater pack to Greenbank Farm and the hounds were loosed into Aiken Crag, where there was some interest.
However, this came to nothing and they went on to Latterhaw Crag, where they marked a fox which soon shot out and down the valley through Aiken Crag, Arnison and Bleaze End before dropping down to the Hag and Deer Howe Wood.
The hounds lost a lot of time in the bottoms and only a few hunted out through Glenamara Park to Black Crag, where a fresh fox caused them to split again.
A single hound, Linnet, was able to hunt slowly through to Harrison Crag before turning out for the Birks and Black Crag. She ran through Cold Cove to Gavel Moss, where the fox got up afresh.
She then ran hard over Black Crag and back through Cold Cove, after which she headed under Lord’s Seat to Braw Crags.
When next seen she was running down the Deepdale Valley under White Crag, where the rest of the pack was laid on.
The allotments above Wall End slowed them down and a steadier hunt went over into Low Wood and under Wall Head, by which time they were moving very slowly.
The pace picked again in Cora Crag and a flying hunt went back into Deepdale by Deepdale Hall to Mosside, Greenbank and Arnison. They then dropped in through Bleaze End for Dawes Wood, where they probably changed foxes.
A poor hunt then went back to Arnison Crag and in for Noran Bank, where the day’s hunting finished.

POOR SCENT

Hunt chairman Mike Taylforth and family hosted the meet at Side Farm, Patterdale, but it was a poor scenting day and the only significant hunt developed in Boredale.
Crossing the valley for Low Brock Crag they went over into Martindale and Raven Crag, where they split. One lot brought their fox back into Boredale and Nettleslack, but finally ran out of scent below Sleet Fell.
They were picked up and taken to Winter Crag, where the rest were marking a fresh fox to ground. It was in a difficult place, however, and had to be left.
Two foxes were killed from the Stainton meet after the hounds were loosed on to Great Mell Fell.
The hounds were stopped off the first fox they found when it crossed for the main area of forestry with little scent.

BOLTED

Another fox was marked and bolted, only to run a short way before going to ground again.
At the same time a handful of hounds had run a fox to ground beyond Routen Ghyll, from where two foxes bolted and were caught on top very quickly.
There was more scent in the Tarn Moss plantation but, as usual, there were too many foxes about, making life difficult for the hounds.
They were unable to bring any of the numerous hunts which started to a successful conclusion.

Plenty of visitors at Travellers Rest meet
Saturday, 22 November 2003

FROM the meet at Dobbin Wood, the hounds of the Ullswater pack found a fox around the Yew Crag plantation and hunted it at a slow pace for about an hour between Yew Crag and the Coombs before the scent finally ran out at the crag.
A fresh fox was then found which the hounds hunted much better through for Hind Crag and then back above Yew Crag and Collier Hag Wood to the Coombs. There, as the followers had expected, a number of foxes were about and several hunts started, but none could be brought to any sort of successful conclusion.

LONG DRAW

There was a large number of visitors at the Travellers Rest meet, but the hounds had a long draw around the Dod, Mossdale, Seldom Seen and Black Crag before a litter of short running foxes was found in Latterbarrow Ghyll.
The pack split straight away, with one lot eventually hunting slowly out to Linkindale, where they marked. After most of the pack had been brought back together, this fox was bolted and caught.
Meanwhile, a few hounds had marked another place under Latterbarrow Ghyll and the rest of the pack was taken there, following which they soon confirmed a fox was at home. A terrier was entered, the fox soon bolted and it was caught in a bracken bed below.
Drawing on into the park, the hounds found a fox and hunted it well up through the Beeches to where it turned sharply about on a rocky spot. With scenting conditions poor, the line was lost by all the hounds but one, which cast wide and hit off the line through the park.
The rest of the pack then regained the line down the Beeches trod and were soon speaking through the park to mark at the earths in the middle, where the first hound had stopped. This fox was also accounted for.
Len and Dorreen Lightburn hosted a very well attended coffee morning at Denny Hill before the hounds were loosed on to the Howes, where a fox was found. They ran up the beck to the Black Wood, where they turned out for Moorahill and headed on through the fields for Roughill Ghyll.
They hunted down the ghyll, sorting out a check amongst some cattle before heading on to Butterwick Crag, where they marked.
On bolting, the fox ran down to the road at Woodfoot Farm, up the ghyll to Skews and then through the fields to Roughill, where the hounds lost the scent in cattle foil.
Another fox was well found in the top end of Cawdale and hunted out through White Bog to High Street.
It headed under Loadpot to drop down the Fusedale Valley to Cote Farm, Mellguards and the Howtown Hotel, where the hounds ran out of scent and were gathered up.
Brownbeck and Heltondale were drawn on the way back to the meet, but no more foxes were found.

TOP CLASS HOUND WORK PAYS OFF FOR ULLSWATER PACK
Saturday, 15 November 2003

FROM the Docker Nook Farm meet in Longsleddale, Ullswater Foxhounds were split for a while on a brace of foxes found lying in Beech Hill, but they were reunited above the crag to run through to Wellfoot where a fox was marked to ground and accounted for.
A few hounds brought a fresh fox back to Beech Hill by Wads Howe and, as the pack got together, was put off afresh in Beech Hill Crag, writes TRIMBUSH.
They then set sail for Sadghyll and went on through for Goatscar. They were well strung out by now but the lead hounds circled out into the mist and brought their fox in by Rough Crags to drop in for Sadghyll once again.
Tail end hounds joined in there but they could hardly own the line up through Sadghyll Wood though it did improve on the open fell as they turned out for Rough Crags and the mist.
Top class hound work paid off as they reached the mist line when the hunted fox was put off and hunted hard in-bank to the valley floor where they killed their fox in the fields above Sadghyll Farm.

BRACE FOUND

On the Wednesday, Capplefall was found to hold a litter and, after an initial circuit of the fell, hounds marked under Mowdy Rake and a brace was accounted for as hounds went to another hunt across the valley in Bannisdale Wood.
Hounds could do very little in the wood, but a few went away on a fox which took them around Bannisdale Head then into the Borrowdale Valley before bringing their fox back into Bannisdale by Capple Fall.
The main body of the pack were laid on and hunted their fox up into Bannisdale Wood which they circled, running back into the beck and eventually marking their fox to ground from where it was bolted and caught.
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Ambler hosted a meet at Greenrigg, Patterdale, on what turned out to be a scentless and frustrating day.
Beckstones Crag held a fox which had sat tight and was found by a single hound but it held no scent at all. Grey Crag held another which was hunted out to Betty Brae then in for Blowick and Silver Point before the pack ran through Birk Fell to Birk Fell Slack.
Hounds were strung out at this point and only a handful could hunt slowly back to Birk Fell Garth where the fox had gone to ground. Bolted from there, a much better hunt went for Betty Brae then in for Blowick where they marked again and the fox was left in a badger sett.

Plenty of foxes around in Kentmere
Saturday, 08 November 2003

THE Ullswater pack’s week in Kentmere began with a fox being found and killed quickly on Lingmell after a lengthy draw from Hartrigg.
A fox disturbed in Hall Cove took the hounds out over Mardale Ill Bell to Blea Water and then on by Long Stile into Riggindale.
When next seen they were hunting back through Caspel Gate to Blea Crags, where the scent failed.
They were picked up and brought back into Kentmere to draw through Gavel Crag, Wander Scar, Froswick and Ill Bell before a fox was found on Steel Rigg.
This took them through a tricky face on Rainsborrow which caused them to string out, but a fox was nevertheless caught by Guards Wood. Another had to be left in Lambfold on a deteriorating scent.
The following day hounds were put into Iron Scar and, although some foxes were found, poor scent made life very difficult until later on, when it improved.
A fox was then hunted around Ivan Scar, Raven Crag and Scales, where the hounds marked.
Following this, a fox was hunted on an ever improving scent from below Buck Crag over the Garburn Road to the park, where the hounds ran down the ghyll for Kentmere Hall. They marked their fox to ground above the sheep pens.
A busy day was had around the HP Plantation and Longhouses Plantation. One fox was marked to ground below Longhouses and another above the plantation.
The best hunt of the day began on a fox found in HP which was hunted out to Longhouses and then out towards Green Quarter, after which it swung back down the ghyll for Millriggs and HP.
The hounds crossed the road at the factory and followed the beck down under Sawmill Cottage and Croft Head to Ullthwaite Barn, where they crossed the road back into HP Plantation.
The deer fence held them up for a while, but Billy Bateman was on hand and they soon got going through the wood to the cape and then out again for Longhouses. They ran through to mark just beyond this area in some rocks, from where the fox was bolted.
Following another circuit of the plantations he was marked to ground again, after which he was quickly bolted and caught.
Margaret and Clara again made everybody very welcome at Millriggs, after which the first fox of the day was found at Sheep Crags.
It was hunted fitfully through the park to Hall Wood and then back above the hall to Ivan Scar, Raven Crag and Scales. The hounds then turned back to Calfhow Crag and the fields, where scent failed.

NASTY WEATHER

Hart Crag held a fox which was hunted over the Garburn Road and through the park to Hall Wood. It then went back through the park to the find, headed out to Buck Crag and disappeared out of sight as the weather turned nasty.
The hounds were last seen by Jimmy Gilpin high out on Yoke, and they were eventually found marking just short of Blue Ghyll in Troutbeck.

BUSY WEEK FOR ULLSWATER HOUNDS
Saturday, 01 November 2003

THE hounds of the Ullswater pack had a busy week leading up to the official opening meet, with two foxes being caught from the meet at Braesteads.
The first was marked, bolted and caught under Striding Edge and the second, having been found at Tarn Crags above Grisedale Tarn, was hunted well through Lock Love to Dollywaggon Pike and then in through Ruthwaite Cove to Spout Crags at a fast pace. This fox then dropped in to cross the path and climb out for St. Sunday Crag.
Once the hounds were on the scree the pace slackened, but perseverance paid off and they were soon marking at the Ash Howe borran, from where the fox was bolted. After a circuit of St. Sunday Crag on some very difficult routes, with the fox at one point binking in a crag from where the hounds flushed him out themselves, they caught him at Ash Howe.
Cec and Helen Coxon again welcomed the hunt to the Stag Inn, Dufton, where their hospitality was much appreciated.
On moving off, a fox was found in the Keisley allotments. Scent was very poor and the hounds did well to stick to the line all around Harbour Flatt, Keisley and back to the gorse at Bow Hall, where they marked.
A bye day was put in at the High Ewebank plantation, where a fox was eventually found. Although the hounds could hunt in the trees, scent on the fell was practically non-existent and the fox was eventually given best as the temperature increased.
A huge crowd watched the joint packs of the Ullswater and Border hounds meet at the Haweswater Hotel. From there, about 40 hounds from the two packs were loosed into Riggindale.
A fox was soon found and hunted at a painfully slow pace through to the wall end, from where they dropped into the bottom and found their fox afresh in the bracken beds. A better hunt then went out onto Dudderwick, where there was a check and only a few hounds really got away for Caspell Gate, under Longstile and over Shortstile, by which time the rest of the pack was beginning to catch up.
They then went into Sailpots, from where they turned through Kidsty Pike. The pack was hunting well now out of the shade and their fox was seen only minutes in front of them as it crossed the valley for Eagle Crag.
Everybody had a great view of a pack of hounds working a line as they dropped in for the valley floor, but the importance of scent was rammed home when they could hunt no more than a few hundred yards into the shade of Riggindale Crags.
They were picked up and drawn on through Whelter in exceptionally hot conditions for the time of year and a fox was found high above Benty Howe. It was hunted all around there for a while before they marked on the Benty Howe borran, from where it was bolted and eventually caught below the path.

SCENT FAILED

From the meet on at the Punchbowl, Askham, the joint pack was loosed on to Helton Fell, where they found in the bracken beds. Unfortunately, this fox ran to Swarthfell where fresh foxes intervened and some time was spent on the lake shore by the Sharrow Bay Hotel and Ullswater Yacht Club before scent failed.
They were gathered up and taken back to Heltondale, where a fox was found in the whins and hunted away up the valley before turning out by Kettle Crag and the Tongue. It was then headed by followers and hounds could do no more.
The next fox was found in Caudale and quickly marked to ground after a circuit of the bracken beds. A good hunt ensued after it was bolted, with the hounds crossing the valley to the quarry, where where they turned out as if for Willdale but turned back in for Caudale before once again dropping in for the beck, which they crossed to climb Caudale Edge.
The fox was making for Heltondale but ran into followers and turned down the top towards Carhullan Farm, where it went to ground low down. It bolted quickly, gaining quite a lot of time on the hounds, and ran out for Caudale Edge again before turning in for the beck which it followed to the mine workings, where it went to ground once again and was given best.

Mist, rain and cloud at Matterdale End
Saturday, 25 October 2003

THICK mist, rain and cloud were the order of the day when Sadie Hindson welcomed the Ullswater pack and a large crowd of followers, many of them from southern England, to Matterdale End.
Great Mell Fell had been the intended draw, but because of the bad visibility the hounds were instead drawn towards the Rookin House forestry.
It became obvious soon after leaving the meet that a fox had been about in the allotments and the hounds quickly cast themselves forward over the New Road into the trees, where they were soon speaking.
As usual in the forestry there were a lot of foxes about and the pack was soon quite well split up, which remained the case for the first hour or so with no hunt coming to any sort of conclusion.
After lunchtime, however, a hunt gathered weight and pace in the top end of the wood. Even in the windy conditions the music was loud and clear, only ending when the fox was caught in a patch of windblown trees.
Another fox fox was then well found and, on an improving scent, the hounds hunted hard all around the forestry until they went away up the wind to the old coach road, where they killed.
From the Kings Arms, Shap, the hounds were loosed into Swindale at the cattle grid, but they drew through as far as Gouther Crag before a fox was found. There was then a litter running around with very little scent to enable the hounds to do anything with them.

FRESH GROUND

Once again, it was not until after lunchtime and the hounds had been taken to fresh ground on the opposite side of the valley that the scent improved.
Finding above the plantation at Swindale Head the pack split, with the main body probably hunting the heel line. However, they were soon flying to join the others, which were having a good hunt through the area above Swindale Head, under Black Bells and back to the allotments.
They then went in for the valley floor, where they marked at a drain. The fox was quickly bolted from there and they hunted out through the intack towards the plantation.
They proceeded to swing back for Selside and Black bells, but they marked short of the crags in a rocky place. There were two foxes in residence in this spot, one of which was bolted and the other despatched.
The hunt then went under Black bells before dropping in for the fields. From there, the hounds climbed out through the intacks and swung back by the fell wall for Black bells, where they marked one again.
With the day drawing on this fox was bolted and caught, after which the hunters faced a long walk down Swindale to their vehicles.

Foxhounds at work on the East Fellside
Saturday, 18 October 2003

THE Elliot family welcomed the Ullswater pack and its supporters to Harbour Flatt, on the East Fellside.
A large gathering of followers, many of them local, saw the hounds find a fox behind the farm, but he carried little scent and was soon given best out in the allotments.
High Cup Nick was drawn blank, but Little Rundale held a fox low down and this was hunted on to Brownber. This went all around the bracken beds, which were on the turn so that the scent was all but wiped out.
They then pushed him away up Great Rundale, where he ran into an odd hound and quickly went to ground in a rock face.
However, he left this spot quite soon and a much better hunt went down Great Rundale to Brownber and then on down the beck under Dufton Pike for Knock, where the hounds lost time in the sheep foil and around the farm buildings.
Perseverance paid off and they were soon marking their fox to ground above the village, where he was despatched.
The meet at the church in Longsleddale was also well attended on a wet and misty morning. The conditions meant there was quite a wait before it was fit to loose the hounds into Yewbarrow Wood, where they had a busy morning on a couple of foxes they found.
One fast hunt finished above the meet with the hounds showing all the signs of having caught their fox, but they were away on another hunt before huntsman John Harrison could get to them.
A few hounds took a fox out by Capplebarrow and back in by Stockdale to Swinklebank Crag, where they spent some time but eventually ran out of scent.
The meet at the Brotherswater Hotel saw conditions unbelievably hot for hounds and followers alike. Although the hounds managed to hunt one fox to ground at Mines Crag, it was lost soon after bolting in the bottom by Brotherswater itself.
With the hounds fairly well spread out through Low Wood and the heat showing no signs of abating, they were gathered up early.
Gary Robinson greeted the pack to the Golden Fleece, at Brough, for his first meet and made everybody very welcome. The hounds were then vanned to Hilton.
They were loosed on to Mell Fell and all was quiet until they were half way up Scoredale, where a fox was put off and hunted down the valley toward Careth. It then turned out over the top and into the wind, at which point the scent all but failed.
From then on the hunt proceeded at walking pace into Gasdale and then over Murton Pike, where he was given best.

HOUNDS COVER A LOT OF GROUND FROM HARTSOP
Saturday, 11 October 2003

THE hounds and followers of the Ullswater pack met at Scales Farm, Helton, for what turned out to be a very wet day of hunting the first of the current season, writes TRIMBUSH.
The first draw of the day was in the bracken beds on Helton Fell. A fox was soon found and pushed out by the mast to Brownbeck and the whins, which the hounds circled to run back into Brownbeck low down, where the scent failed.
Another fox was found in Heltondale and, after a short hunt around the bracken beds, it was marked to ground near Kettle Crag. It was then accounted for.
Drawing on up Heltondale, the hounds raised an old fox which carried a lot more scent. They hunted hard in Brownbeck, crossing the beck and climbing out for Castleside at top pace.
Running up the valley, they recrossed the beck and ran the fell back to Kettle Crag, where they were at fault for a few minutes.
Held on, however, they found their fox afresh and went down the valley again to the whins and on to the fields at dale Head.
They were brought to their noses in the fields and worked out to the fell wall inch by inch, after which they came back in to cross the beck for the whins, where they could do no more.
Held on up the valley through the bracken beds, the hounds put the fox up again high out in the top of Heltondale and ran well into Brownbeck and Castleside, where they marked in a deep place.
The fox soon bolted from this spot and was hunted hard down Brownbeck and then over the tongue into Heltondale, where he went to ground again. He was then accounted for.
A lot of ground was covered from Hartsop, including Pasture Beck from where a bit of an old hunt went by Atty Cove, only to fizzle out.
They went on by Grey Crag and around into Hayeswater to the fell head and High Street.
There was a faint drag around Hayes Gill past Fox Bield and out into the gale on High Street, but this petered out in the top of Riggindale.
Drawing on down the tops towards Angle Tarn, a few hounds had a short hunt from Buck Crag to Heck Cove, but that also came to nothing. They were then gathered up and drawn back through Slinger Wood to finish.

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